SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.31 número4Estudio de casos y controles en un grupo de mujeres embarazadas con experiencias adversas en la infancia y/o adolescencia e infecciones de transmisión sexualTrastorno obsesivo-compulsivo en niños y adolescentes: Una actualización. Segunda parte índice de autoresíndice de assuntospesquisa de artigos
Home Pagelista alfabética de periódicos  

Salud mental

versão impressa ISSN 0185-3325

Salud Ment vol.31 no.4 México Jul./Ago. 2008

 

Artículo original

 

Prevalencia del consumo riesgoso y dañino de alcohol y factores de riesgo en estudiantes universitarios de primer ingreso

 

Prevalence of risky and harmful alcohol consumption and risk factors in freshmen students

 

Alejandro Díaz Martínez1 *, L. Rosa Díaz Martínez1, Carlos A. Hernández–Ávila1,2, José Narro Robles3, Héctor Fernández Varela4, Cuauhtémoc Solís Torres4

 

1 Departamento de Psiquiatría y Salud Mental, Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM.

2 Department of Psychiatry and Alcohol Research Center, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut, USA.

3 Rectoría de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM.

4 Dirección General de Servicios Médicos de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM.

 

*Correspondencia:
Dr. Alejandro Díaz Martínez,
Departamento de Psiquiatría y Salud Mental,
Facultad de Medicina,
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM.
Teléfono: 5623 2129
Email:
admar@servidor.unam.mx

 

Recibido: 3 de abril de 2008.
Aceptado: 2 de mayo de 2008.

 

Abstract

Background

In Mexico, alcohol is the most widely used substance among young adults. Alcohol consumption in this age group contributes importantly to the most frequent causes of mortality and morbidity (e.g., accidents, violence, homicides, suicide and risky behaviors).

Around the world, college or university attendance has emerged in the literature as a risk factor for drinking problems among young adults. In Mexico, data from the most recent National Survey on Addictions showed that lifetime and current drinking is experienced by more than half of the Mexicans attending college education. Despite this, in our country there is a paucity of epidemiological studies examining drinking behavior and correlates among those attending college. Findings in non–representative samples of students attending public and private universities in Mexico City suggest that, during the last two decades, there has been an increase in the frequency of lifetime and current drinking in this population. Additionally, these studies have shown that, in comparison to young adults of the same age in the general population, university students may experience a greater prevalence of lifetime and current alcohol drinking.

Regarding the frequency of unhealthy drinking among Mexican college students, to our knowledge there are no prevalence estimates of hazardous or harmful drinking published. However, observations in non–random samples of university students in Mexico City suggested that at least one in three men and one in five women incurred in unhealthy drinking (e.g., ≥ 5 drinks per occasion or drinking to intoxication) at least once during the last month. Hazardous and harmful drinking is respectively defined by a pattern of alcohol consumption conferring a greater risk for health problems or that is frankly conducive to medical or psychological complications (e.g., accidents, victimization, violence, alcohol dependence, liver cirrhosis and/or other medical complications).

The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), developed by the World Health Organization, is currently the only instrument specifically designed to identify hazardous and harmful drinking. Although the AUDIT was initially validated among older adult patients in primary care settings, this instrument has consistently shown to be valid and reliable in detecting alcohol problems in different populations such as the college students in many countries around the world.

Given the public health implications of estimating the frequency of hazardous and harmful drinking among college students in Mexico, and given the importance of elucidating the variables influencing this problem, we decided to conduct the present study. To our knowledge, this is the first report published in the international literature on the prevalence of hazardous and harmful drinking among college students in a Latin American country.

Objective

In the analysis described here, derived from the project entitled Early Identification and Treatment of Problem Drinkers at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), our aim was to examine the frequency and risk factors for hazardous and harmful drinking among Mexican university students. More specifically, our objectives were: 1. To determine the past–year prevalence of hazardous and harmful drinking among UNAM college freshmen; and 2. To examine in this population the effects of demographic and family variables on the likelihood of hazardous and harmful drinking.

Subjects and methods

This study was a cross–sectional survey that was conducted at the beginning of the school year during the registration period between September 1st and September 30th, 2005. In 2005, a total of 34 000 students were accepted to initiate college at the nine UNAM college campuses located in the Mexico City metropolitan area. Of these, 24 921 (73.3%) students (age=18.7±4.3 years; 55.7% women) consented in answering the survey and provided complete data. Consequently, 9 079 students (26.7%) were excluded from the analysis due to lack of consent, incomplete data or due to their absence at the time of registration.

We used the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) to examine past–year prevalence of hazardous and harmful drinking. This self–report instrument includes 10 items that examine frequency and intensity of drinking (items 1–3), presence of alcohol dependence symptoms (items 4–6) and negative consequences of drinking (items 7–10), yielding a maximum possible score of 40 points. Among adult patients in primary care settings, it has been accepted that an AUDIT score of 0–7 points reflects safe levels of alcohol consumption, whereas a score of 8 points or greater indicates the presence of hazardous and harmful drinking. It has been described, however, that among college students, an AUDIT score of 6 points or greater reliably identifies those students experiencing this problem.

In the analysis presented here, we separately examined and reported the prevalence estimates and correlates of hazardous and harmful drinking using both AUDIT cut–off scores (≥ 6 and ≥ 8).

The AUDIT was administered at the same time as a wellness screening survey that the UNAM Medical Services routinely administer to all registering freshmen at the beginning of the school year. Questions in the wellness survey pertained students' medical and dental health, family medical history, immunizations, use of tobacco and other drugs.

In addition, demographic and socioeconomic information was obtained from a questionnaire also routinely administered by the UNAM registrar's office. This questionnaire included 37 items inquiring about gender, age, employment and marital status, monthly family income, parental education, place and type of residency, persons with whom the student resided, and questions on previous academic performance.

We estimated the prevalence of hazardous and harmful drinking and their respective 95% confidence intervals [95% CI] in the total of the sample, and separately by age group, gender, marital and working status, monthly family income group, parental education, and by variables reflecting whether the students lived with their family, peers or alone. These variables were modeled using simulated binary terms (0,1). Subsequently, multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between hazardous and harmful drinking and the demographic and socioeconomic variables listed above. These were entered simultaneously into the logistic regression equation. In order to summarize the level of risk of hazardous and harmful drinking conferred by significant variables in the logistic regression model, odds ratios (OR) and their respective 95% CI's were estimated. All the significant effects reported here were adjusted considering the effects of the remaining demographic and socioeconomic variables.

Results

Among the university freshmen examined here, when an AUDIT cutoff score of ≥ 8 was used, the prevalence of hazardous and harmful drinking was 11.1%. When an AUDIT score of ≥ 6 was considered, a frequency of 18.4% was then observed. Men (AUDIT ≥ 8: 17.3%; AUDIT ≥ 6: 27.4%) experienced this problem more frequently than women (AUDIT ≥ 8: 6.2%; AUDIT ≥ 6: 11.3%). The greater prevalence of hazardous and harmful drinking among men was observed in all age groups and regardless of working or marital status, family income, parental education or regardless of the persons with whom the student reported to reside. Controlling for demographic and socioeconomic differences between men and women, we found that the risk of experiencing hazardous and harmful drinking among men was almost three times greater than in women (OR's [95% CI]: AUDIT ≥ 8 or ≥ 6 respectively: 2.9[2.7–3.3] or 2.8[2.6–3.0]).

In both, men and women, the greatest frequency of hazardous and harmful drinking occurred among those 20 to 25 years of age. Older students showed a gradual reduction in the prevalence of this problem; with those who were 29 years old or older experiencing the lowest risk of being affected.

Among those students who reported to work, there was a greater frequency and increased risk of hazardous and harmful drinking. Furthermore, this risk increased with the number of reported weekly working hours. This last effect was seen unequivocally only in men, with the greatest likelihood of hazardous and harmful drinking being observed among the group of male students weekly working 32 hours or longer.

Also, a higher monthly family income was associated with a greater chance of hazardous and harmful drinking. Men in the highest family income group (10 or more minimum salaries) experienced the greatest risk for this problem. Among women, however, this effect was only observed when an AUDIT cut–off score of six or greater was used to screen for hazardous and harmful drinking.

Although we did not find any effects of the number of years of parental education on the probability of drinking problems in male students, among women, there was a greater risk of hazardous and harmful drinking among students having a father with a greater number of years of education (≥ 12 years). Similarly, among female students, a greater number of years of education in the mother (≥ 12 years) also increased the chance of being affected by hazardous and harmful drinking.

Regarding variables that conferred a reduction in the prevalence and in the risk of hazardous and harmful drinking, we observed that those students who were married experienced a reduction in the likelihood of this problem.

Finally, in our sample, there were no effects on the probability of hazardous and harmful drinking from variables reflecting whether the students lived with their family, with peers or alone.

Conclusions

Hazardous and harmful drinking is a frequent problem among Mexican university freshmen. Variables associated with an increased risk of this problem may exert their effects by facilitating availability and access to alcoholic beverages, and facilitating exposure to high–risk activities for alcohol consumption. These findings have direct implications in designing preventive and treatment interventions in the larger population of college and university students in Mexico.

Key words: Alcoholism, alcohol, AUDIT, hazardous drinking, harmful drinking, college drinking, México, Latin America.

 

Resumen

Antecedentes

En México, el alcohol es la sustancia potencialmente adictiva que se utiliza con mayor frecuencia por los adultos jóvenes. Información proveniente de la Encuesta Nacional de Adicciones más reciente muestra que más de 50% de los jóvenes entre los 18–29 años ha consumido bebidas alcohólicas al menos una vez durante el último mes. En la Ciudad de México se ha encontrado que más de la mitad de las mujeres y cerca de dos terceras partes de los hombres entre 18–29 años de edad consume regularmente bebidas alcohólicas. Durante los últimos años, el consumo de bebidas alcohólicas se ha venido incrementando importantemente entre los jóvenes mexicanos de ambos sexos en edad de recibir una educación superior. A nivel internacional, la bibliografía sugiere que la población estudiantil de los centros de educación superior es un grupo de mayor riesgo para el desarrollo de problemas por consumo de alcohol. En México, aunque se desconoce si los estudiantes de educación superior son un grupo de mayor riesgo para estos abusos, algunas encuestas y reportes sugieren que los problemas por consumo de alcohol tienen una importancia creciente. En cuanto al consumo de alcohol que excede los niveles seguros para la salud (≥2 bebidas estándar al día en las mujeres o ≥3 bebidas estándar al día en los hombres), el Observatorio Mexicano del Alcohol y Drogas describió que en el año 2002 el consumo de cinco o más copas por ocasión de consumo afecta a tres de cinco hombres y a una de cinco mujeres. Aunque problemas metodológicos y sesgos de selección potenciales en estas encuestas dificultan su interpretación, sus resultados sugieren que el consumo de alcohol, particularmente el consumo riesgoso y potencialmente dañino, es común entre los estudiantes universitarios de la Ciudad de México.

El consumo riesgoso y dañino de alcohol (CRDA) se sitúa en un continuum de severidad y se define como un patrón de consumo de bebidas embriagantes que colocan al sujeto en riesgo de desarrollar problemas de salud y/o que desemboca en francas complicaciones físicas y/o psicológicas (accidentes, victimización, violencia, dependencia al alcohol, cirrosis hepática, etc.). De acuerdo a los reportes de la bibliografía internacional, este es el primer estudio publicado sobre la prevalencia de consumo peligroso y dañino de alcohol en estudiantes universitarios en América Latina.

Objetivo

En el trabajo que se presenta aquí, que forma parte del proyecto para la Identificación Temprana y Tratamiento Oportuno de bebedores con Consumo Excesivo de Alcohol en Estudiantes Universitarios de la UNAM, nos propusimos evaluar la prevalencia del CRDA durante el último año y examinar los factores de riesgo y protección respectivos en estudiantes de primer ingreso a la licenciatura de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. De manera especifica, nos propusimos: 1) estimar la prevalencia del CRDA durante el último año en los estudiantes de primer ingreso a la licenciatura de la UNAM, y 2) evaluar en esta población la influencia de las variables sociodemográficas y familiares en el riesgo para el CRDA.

Material y métodos

Se trató de un estudio transversal en el que se estudiaron 24921 estudiantes del primer año de la licenciatura de la UNAM (edad=18.7±4.3 años; 55% mujeres). Para detectar aquellos estudiantes que en el último año incurrieron en el CRDA, se utilizó el instrumento de tamizaje Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT). Se utilizó la regresión logística multinomial para examinar los efectos de las variables demográficas y sociofamiliares, así como para calcular Odds Ratios (OR) y sus respectivos intervalos de confianza al 95%. Este instrumento consiste de 10 preguntas que exploran la frecuencia e intensidad del consumo de bebidas alcohólicas. Con el objetivo de poder comparar nuestros hallazgos con los de otros investigadores, se examinaron y se reportan separadamente las prevalencias del CRDA con base en puntos de corte de 8 y de 6 en el AUDIT. Para el reporte de datos demográficos y puntajes del AUDIT, se utilizaron porcentajes, promedios y desviaciones estándar. Se emplearon las pruebas de contraste de medias (análisis de varianza) y de proporciones (χ2) dependiendo de la naturaleza de cada variable. Se calcularon las prevalencias del CRDA con sus respectivos intervalos de confianza al 95%.

Resultados

Usando un puntaje de corte en el AUDIT de ocho y de seis puntos, la prevalencia del CRDA durante el último año fue respectivamente de 11.1% y de 18.4%. Esta fue mayor en los hombres (AUDIT≥8: 17.3%; AUDIT≥6: 27.4%) que en las mujeres (AUDIT≥8: 6.2%; AUDIT≥6: 11.3%). Además del sexo masculino, aquellos estudiantes que trabajaban y que reportaron un mayor ingreso familiar mensual, tuvieron un mayor riesgo de experimentar el CRDA. En las mujeres, pero no en los hombres, un mayor nivel educativo tanto en el padre como en la madre también se relacionó con un incremento en el CRDA. Contrariamente, una mayor edad y el ser casado se asoció con una reducción en el riesgo del CRDA.

Conclusiones

El CRDA entre los estudiantes de nuevo ingreso a la licenciatura de la UNAM es un problema frecuente que al parecer se relaciona con variables que facilitarían la disponibilidad y el acceso a bebidas alcohólicas y la exposición a actividades de alto riesgo para el consumo. Estos hallazgos tienen implicaciones directas en el diseño de intervenciones enfocadas a la prevención y tratamiento del CRDA en la población estudiantil universitaria de nuestro país.

Para lograr lo anterior se estudió a una muestra mayoritaria de los estudiantes de primer ingreso a la licenciatura en los nueve campus que comprende el sistema de escuelas y facultades de la UNAM ubicadas en el área metropolitana de la Ciudad de México.

Palabras clave: Alcoholismo, alcohol, AUDIT, consumo riesgoso, consumo dañino, estudiantes universitarios, México, América Latina.

 

INTRODUCCIÓN

En México el alcohol es la sustancia potencialmente adictiva que se utiliza con mayor frecuencia por los adultos jóvenes, especialmente entre aquellos en edad de recibir una educación universitaria o superior. Información proveniente de la Encuesta Nacional de Adicciones más reciente1 muestra que 71.3% de los jóvenes en este grupo de edad (18–29 años) ha consumido bebidas alcohólicas alguna vez en su vida mientras que 52.5% lo ha hecho al menos una vez durante el último mes. En la Ciudad de México se ha encontrado que más de la mitad de las mujeres y cerca de dos terceras partes de los hombres entre los 18–29 años de edad consume regularmente bebidas alcohólicas.1

Durante los últimos años, la edad en la cual los hombres en México han consumido con mayor frecuencia e intensidad bebidas alcohólicas, se ha reducido de manera alarmante. Después de situarse entre los 30–49 años de edad en 1988, disminuyó hasta encontrarse entre los 18–29 años de edad en 1998 (Medina–Mora et al., 2001; Medina–Mora, 2007).2,3 Coincidentemente este rango incluye las edades durante las cuales los adultos jóvenes en México generalmente asisten a los centros de educación superior.

En la bibliografía internacional se puede observar un interés creciente por los problemas debidos al consumo de alcohol en los jóvenes universitarios. Diversos reportes han documentado tasas elevadas de problemas por consumo de bebidas embriagantes en los campus universitarios de los Estados Unidos, Canadá, la Comunidad Europea, Australia, Nueva Zelanda, Brasil y Ecuador.4 Lo anterior ha generado una gran preocupación en la opinión pública y en las autoridades sanitarias de esos países. Por ejemplo, en los Estados Unidos el consumo de alcohol y sus complicaciones entre los estudiantes de educación superior ha sido identificado por el gobierno federal como un problema de salud pública mayor y como el principal problema de salud que aqueja a las universidades.5,6 Se ha estimado que el consumo de bebidas alcohólicas en las instituciones de educación superior de ese país puede relacionarse anualmente con la muerte de 1 400 estudiantes, 500 000 lesiones, 600 000 agresiones físicas y 70 000 agresiones sexuales.7 Aún más, debido a que se ha observado que la prevalencia del consumo de alcohol y problemas relacionados es generalmente mayor en los estudiantes universitarios que entre los jóvenes de la misma edad que no son estudiantes,7–10 se ha sugerido que la población estudiantil de los centros de educación superior es un grupo de mayor riesgo para el desarrollo de problemas por consumo de alcohol.11 Entre las variables que podrían explicar este mayor riesgo estarían las sociodemográficas (sexo, edad, nivel socioeconómico, nivel educativo de los padres, estado civil, lugar de residencia, etc.) así como variables ambientales y culturales propias del contexto universitario que facilitarían y promoverían el consumo excesivo de alcohol.12

Aunque se desconoce si en México los estudiantes de educación superior son un grupo de mayor riesgo para estos problemas, algunas encuestas y reportes anecdóticos por parte de profesores, padres de familia y los mismos alumnos, sugieren que los problemas por consumo de alcohol tienen una importancia creciente. Información publicada por el Observatorio Mexicano del Alcohol y Drogas13 indica que en 1982 la prevalencia de vida del consumo de alcohol en una muestra de 1793 estudiantes de diferentes facultades de la UNAM fue de 86.6%. Posteriormente, en el 2002, entre 1502 estudiantes de psicología dicha prevalencia fue de 90.1%. De manera más reciente, en una muestra que incluyó 678 estudiantes de la UNAM y de varias universidades privadas de la Ciudad de México, Mora–Ríos et al. reportaron en 2005 una frecuencia de consumo de alcohol durante el último mes de 93.3% en los hombres y de 84.3% en las mujeres.14

En cuanto al consumo de alcohol que excede los niveles seguros para la salud (≥2 bebidas estándar al día en las mujeres o ≥3 bebidas estándar al día en los hombres), el Observatorio Mexicano del Alcohol y Drogas13 describió que en el 2002 el consumo de cinco o más copas por ocasión, al menos una vez durante el último mes, ocurrió en 23% de los estudiantes de psicología de la UNAM, afectando más frecuentemente a los hombres (32.0%) que a las mujeres (20.8%). Posteriormente, Mora–Ríos et al. (2005)14 reportaron una prevalencia mayor de dicho consumo, encontrándolo en 68.0% de los hombres y 39.8% de las mujeres.

Aunque algunos problemas metodológicos y sesgos de selección potenciales en estas encuestas dificultan su interpretación, sus resultados sugieren que el consumo de alcohol, particularmente el consumo riesgoso y potencialmente dañino, es común entre los estudiantes universitarios de la Ciudad de México.

El consumo riesgoso y dañino de alcohol (CRDA) se sitúa en un continuum de severidad y se define como un patrón de consumo de bebidas embriagantes que colocan al sujeto en riesgo de desarrollar problemas de salud y/o que desemboca en francas complicaciones físicas y/o psicológicas (accidentes, victimización, violencia, dependencia al alcohol, cirrosis hepática, etc.). La prueba Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), desarrollada por la Organización Mundial de la Salud, es actualmente el único instrumento diseñado específicamente para identificar el CRDA.15 En México no se cuenta con estimaciones de CRDA en la población general o en poblaciones de estudiantes de educación superior, sin embargo, en un estudio que examinó con el AUDIT a 45117 derechohabientes del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social,16 se encontró que durante el último año el CRDA fue relativamente común entre los jóvenes derechohabientes en edad de recibir educación superior, reportándose una prevalencia de 17.9% y 22.5%, respectivamente, en los grupos de 12–19 y de 20–24 años de edad.

En el trabajo que se presenta aquí, que forma parte del proyecto para la identificación temprana y tratamiento oportuno de bebedores con consumo excesivo de alcohol en estudiantes universitarios de la UNAM, nos propusimos evaluar la frecuencia y los factores de riesgo demográficos para el CRDA en una muestra de estudiantes universitarios mexicanos. De manera especifica, nos propusimos: 1. estimar la prevalencia del CRDA durante el último año en los estudiantes de primer ingreso a la licenciatura de la UNAM, y 2. evaluar en esta población la influencia de las variables sociodemográficas y familiares en el riesgo para el CRDA.

Para lograr esto se estudió a una muestra mayoritaria de los estudiantes de primer ingreso a la licenciatura en los nueve campus que comprende el sistema de escuelas y facultades de la UNAM ubicadas en el área metropolitana de la Ciudad de México.

 

MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS

Diseño del estudio

El diseño del estudio fue el de una encuesta transversal en los estudiantes del primer año de la licenciatura en el sistema escolarizado de la UNAM. La encuesta se realizó al inicio del calendario escolar durante el periodo de inscripciones del 1° de agosto al 30 de septiembre 2005.

Población

De un total de 34 000 estudiantes aceptados al primer año de la licenciatura en las diferentes facultades y escuelas que comprenden el sistema escolarizado de la UNAM en el área metropolitana de la Ciudad de México, se evaluaron 24 921 estudiantes (73.3%) que consintieron en participar en la encuesta y que proporcionaron información completa y apropiada para el análisis.

Instrumentos

Alcohol use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) versión en español. Este instrumento consiste de 10 preguntas que exploran la frecuencia e intensidad del consumo de bebidas alcohólicas. Este cuestionario fue diseñado originalmente por la Organización Mundial de la Salud como un instrumento de tamizaje autoaplicable para detectar el CRDA en pacientes que acuden a hospitales o clínicas de primer nivel de atención. Su validez y confiabilidad también se han establecido en poblaciones diversas que incluye a la población estudiantil universitaria en diversas partes del mundo.15,17–20

Las tres primeras preguntas del AUDIT exploran la cantidad y frecuencia del consumo de alcohol. Las preguntas 4–6 examinan síntomas de la dependencia al alcohol, mientras que las preguntas 7–10 exploran las consecuencias negativas asociadas al consumo de alcohol. Cada pregunta del AUDIT tiene de tres a cinco posibles respuestas. Cada respuesta tiene un valor numérico que va de cero hasta dos o cuatro puntos. La sumatoria de los puntos de cada respuesta da un puntaje total con un máximo posible de 40 puntos.

En general se considera que en la población adulta mayor de 21 años de edad un puntaje total de 0 a 7 puntos en el AUDIT refleja niveles de consumo seguro de alcohol, mientras que puntajes de ocho o más puntos indican la presencia del CRDA. Diversos estudios17–20 han documentado que, en la población estudiantil de nivel licenciatura, un puntaje en el AUDIT de seis o más puntos indican de manera confiable la presencia de este problema. En el trabajo que se presenta aquí, con el objetivo de poder comparar nuestros hallazgos con los de otros investigadores que han utilizado como punto de corte un puntaje de ocho puntos o más16 o de seis puntos o más,17–20 se examinaron y se reportan separadamente las prevalencias del CRDA con base en ambos puntos de corte en el AUDIT.

Hoja de Datos Estadísticos de los Aspirantes al Primer Ingreso a la Licenciatura. Este instrumento consiste de 37 preguntas que recogen información sobre las características del estudiante (sexo, estado civil, participación laboral e ingresos familiares mensuales) y capta, así mismo, datos sobre la familia de origen (escolaridad, ocupación del padre y de la madre), lugar y personas con las que reside (padres, otros familiares, cónyuge, amigos o solo) y sobre los antecedentes escolares previos del estudiante.

En la UNAM, la Dirección General de Estadística y Sistemas de Información Institucionales se encarga de producir esta encuesta, la cual se aplica a los estudiantes que han finalizado el bachillerato en la UNAM y que por medio del pase automático reglamentado buscan su ingreso en el nivel licenciatura. Esta encuesta también se aplica a los estudiantes provenientes de otras instituciones (públicas y privadas) que por medio del concurso de selección buscan su ingreso al nivel licenciatura de la UNAM. En este análisis se utilizó la información tanto de los estudiantes aceptados por medio del pase automático como de aquellos aceptados por medio del examen de selección, siempre y cuando el estudiante concluyera los trámites de inscripción al primer año de la licenciatura.

Procedimientos

Como parte de la encuesta general de salud que la Dirección General de Servicios Médicos (DGSM) de la UNAM aplica de manera rutinaria todos los años buscando detectar tempranamente problemas de salud en todos los estudiantes de primer ingreso de la UNAM, se administró el AUDIT de manera suplementaria como prueba de tamizaje para detectar problemas relacionados con el consumo de alcohol.

En cada facultad y escuela de la UNAM, un responsable designado por el Departamento de Psiquiatría y Salud Mental de la Facultad de Medicina (DPSMFM), en coordinación con los responsables de la encuesta general de salud de la DSM, se encargó de la distribución y recolección diaria del AUDIT entre los estudiantes que realizaban sus trámites de inscripción al primer año de la licenciatura. A todos los estudiantes se les garantizó la confidencialidad de sus respuestas y se les pidió su consentimiento para participar. A los estudiantes se les dio la opción de no contestar los cuestionarios si así lo deseaban y se les explicó que su negativa a participar no afectaría en ninguna forma sus trámites de inscripción o su estatus como estudiantes de la UNAM. Posteriormente, las encuestas fueron recolectadas por el responsable del DPSMFM quien las transfirió a la Dirección de Servicios de Computo de la UNAM (DGSCA) para su captura por un sensor de lectura óptica. La información capturada fue almacenada en una base de datos electrónica que posteriormente fue combinada con la información proveniente de la hoja de datos estadísticos de los aspirantes al primer ingreso a la licenciatura para su análisis.

Análisis estadístico

Para el reporte de datos demográficos y puntajes del AUDIT y de acuerdo a las características de cada variable, se utilizaron porcentajes, promedios y desviaciones estándar. Se emplearon pruebas de contraste de medias (análisis de varianza) y de proporciones (χ2) dependiendo de la naturaleza de cada variable. Se calcularon las prevalencias del CRDA con sus respectivos intervalos de confianza al 95% (IC 95%) en la totalidad de la muestra y de acuerdo al sexo de los estudiantes. También se estimó la prevalencia del CRDA de acuerdo al grupo de edad, el estado civil, el o la(s) persona(s) con las que el estudiante residía, el estatus laboral, el ingreso familiar mensual y el nivel escolar del padre y la madre. Se utilizó posteriormente la regresión logística multinomial para examinar la asociación de las variables sociodemográficas y familiares con el CRDA. Estas variables se modelaron utilizando términos simulados binarios (0,1). Todos los análisis se ajustaron tomando en cuenta los efectos de las variables socioeconómicas y/o familiares restantes. Finalmente se calcularon los odds ratios (OR) y sus respectivos IC 95%, para resumir el nivel de riesgo de ser afectado por el CRDA conferido por las variables sociodemográficas y familiares.

 

RESULTADOS

El cuadro 1 muestra las características demográficas de la muestra estudiada.

En nuestra muestra la mayoría de los estudiantes fueron mujeres (55.7%), quienes en general reportaron ser de menor edad que los hombres. La mayoría de los estudiantes describió ser soltero, vivir y ser sostenido económicamente por los padres. Sin embargo, la tercera parte de los estudiantes reportó que trabajaban. Aunque la proporción de estudiantes casados fue mayor entre las mujeres que entre los hombres, los hombres describieron más frecuentemente no vivir con los padres, sostenerse por ellos mismos y trabajar. Aproximadamente la mitad de los estudiantes reportó ingresos familiares iguales o menores a tres salarios mínimos mensuales, describiendo los hombres un mayor ingreso familiar mensual que las mujeres. Finalmente, más de la mitad de los estudiantes reportaron que sus padres y madres tuvieron más de seis años de educación. Uno de cada cinco estudiantes reportó tener una madre con una educación de 12 o más años, mientras que uno de cada tres reportó tener un padre con ese nivel de educación.

Prevalencia del CRDA en los estudiantes de primer ingreso a la licenciatura

En el panel superior del cuadro 2 se muestran, en el total de la muestra y separadamente en las mujeres y los hombres, las prevalencias durante el último año del CRDA. En los paneles inferiores del mismo cuadro se muestran las prevalencias del CRDA en función de las variables sociodemográficas examinadas.

En la muestra descrita aquí se encontró que cuando el CRDA se definió por un puntaje en el AUDIT igual o mayor a ocho puntos, éste afectó a poco más de uno de cada 10 estudiantes. Por otro lado, cuando se utilizó un puntaje en el AUDIT igual o mayor a seis puntos, el CRDA se encontró en aproximadamente uno de cada cinco estudiantes. También se observó que el CRDA, independientemente del puntaje del AUDIT utilizado, afectó con mayor frecuencia a los hombres que a las mujeres. Esta mayor prevalencia del CRDA en los hombres se observó en todos los grupos de edad, de estado civil, de parentesco o de relación con las personas con las que el estudiante reportó vivir, de estatus laboral, de ingreso familiar, y de nivel de educación paterna y/o materna (cuadro 2).

Al controlar por las diferencias de género las variables demográficas y familiares examinadas, se estimó que el riesgo de sufrir el CRDA durante el último año fue casi tres veces mayor en los hombres que en las mujeres (cuadro 3).

Variables de riesgo del CRDA

En los cuadros 3, 4 y 5 se muestran, respectivamente, en el total de la muestra y separadamente en los hombres y las mujeres, el nivel de riesgo ajustado para el CRDA, en función de las variables sociodemográficas examinadas en este análisis.

Tanto en el total de la muestra (cuadros 2 y 3) como en los hombres (cuadro 5) y en las mujeres por separado (cuadro 4), se observó que la frecuencia y el riesgo mayor de ser afectado por el CRDA ocurrió en los estudiantes de 20 a 22 y de 23 a 25 años de edad. La frecuencia de este problema disminuyó gradualmente en los grupos de mayor edad, siendo en los estudiantes de 29 o más años, el grupo en donde se observó la menor prevalencia y el menor riesgo de ser afectado por el CRDA (cuadro 3).

Separadamente en los hombres y en las mujeres, así como en la muestra total, se observó que la mayor prevalencia y la mayor probabilidad de CRDA ocurrió en los estudiantes que reportaron trabajar. También se observó que la frecuencia y el riesgo de CRDA se incrementaron con el número de horas trabajadas semanalmente. Así, los estudiantes que reportaron trabajar 32 horas o más fueron los que experimentaron la mayor probabilidad de ser afectados por el CRDA. Sin embargo, este último efecto en este riesgo sólo se detectó de manera inequívoca en los estudiantes del sexo masculino.

Por otro lado, se observó que en la totalidad de la muestra la prevalencia y la probabilidad del CRDA se incrementó con el ingreso mensual familiar. La mayor frecuencia y riesgo de padecer este problema ocurrió en aquellos estudiantes que reportaron los ingresos familiares mensuales más elevados (10 o más salarios mínimos). Aunque en los hombres el efecto anterior se observó cuando se usaron ambas definiciones del CRDA, en las mujeres la influencia del ingreso mensual familiar en la probabilidad del CRDA sólo se observó cuando el problema se definió por una calificación en el AUDIT de seis o más puntos.

En el total de la muestra, las prevalencias y la probabilidad del CRDA también se incrementaron con el número de años de educación del padre. Un examen por separado de los estudiantes del sexo masculino y femenino, reveló que sólo en las mujeres una mayor educación del padre incrementó el riesgo de ser afectada por el CRDA. De manera similar, sólo en las mujeres se detectó un efecto del nivel de educación materna, pues el mayor riesgo para el CRDA se observó en aquellas estudiantes que reportaron tener una madre con 12 o más años de educación.

En cuanto a las variables que se asociaron con una reducción en la frecuencia y el riesgo del CRDA, se encontró que la probabilidad del CRDA tanto en los hombres como en las mujeres se redujo en los estudiantes que reportaron estar casados.

Por último, ni en la totalidad de la muestra ni en los hombres o en las mujeres considerados por separado, se observaron influencias de las variables que indicaban el parentesco o la relación de las personas con quien los estudiantes residían (padre y/o madre y/o hermanos, otros familiares, cónyuge, compañeros o solo) en el riesgo de ser afectado por el CRDA.

 

DISCUSIÓN

Entre los estudiantes de primer ingreso a la licenciatura encontramos que el CRDA es un problema frecuente, especialmente entre los hombres de 20 a 25 años de edad. En los estudiantes de ambos sexos, el trabajar incrementó el riesgo de ser afectado, particularmente en los hombres que trabajaban un mayor número de horas. Un mayor ingreso familiar también incrementó el riesgo del CRDA en ambos sexos, aunque en las mujeres esto sólo se observó cuando se usó una calificación de seis o más puntos en el AUDIT. En las mujeres pero no en los hombres, un mayor nivel educativo tanto en el padre como en la madre se relacionó con un incremento en el CRDA. Contrariamente, el riesgo de ser afectado por este problema fue menor en los hombres y mujeres que reportaron ser casados y en los y las estudiantes de mayor edad. Finalmente, no se observó influencia en el CRDA del parentesco o de la relación de las personas con quien los estudiantes residían.

Aunque no existen estudios previos que hayan examinado el CRDA en estudiantes de educación superior en México, nuestros hallazgos concuerdan con lo reportado por Morales–García et al.16 quienes describieron en la población derechohabiente del IMSS una prevalencia del CRDA mayor en los hombres que en las mujeres y una frecuencia de este problema similar a la observada por nosotros en los hombres de 20–25 años. Nuestro estudio difiere en que las estudiantes de 20–25 años, presentaron el CRDA casi dos veces más frecuentemente que las mujeres derechohabientes de la misma edad. Otra diferencia fue que en nuestra muestra el CRDA se incrementó en los estudiantes de ambos sexos después de los 19 años de edad, alcanzando su mayor frecuencia en aquellos de entre 20 y 25 años, para posteriormente disminuir y alcanzar su nivel más bajo en los y las estudiantes de 29 o más años de edad. En los hombres derechohabientes de 12 a 49 años estudiados por Morales García et al.,16 hubo un incremento lineal del CRDA con la edad, mientras que en las mujeres derechohabientes, las prevalencias del CRDA permanecieron constantes en todos los grupos de edad.

Nuestro hallazgo de una relación curvilineal entre la edad y la prevalencia del CRDA concuerdan con estudios que han observado en los estudiantes universitarios un curso del consumo excesivo de alcohol variable y predominantemente transitorio.21 Como nosotros, estos reportes han descrito que después de un incremento inicial en los estudiantes más jóvenes el consumo excesivo de alcohol muestra una reducción gradual en años subsecuentes hasta alcanzar niveles de moderación en los estudiantes de mayor edad. Este fenómeno de «maduración» también conocido como «alcoholismo limitado por el desarrollo» sugiere que conforme los estudiantes maduran biológica y psicológicamente, al mismo tiempo que adquieren más responsabilidades (escolares, familiares y/o profesionales), el consumo problemático de alcohol declina.21 Sólo en el caso de un subgrupo de estudiantes, genética y ambientalmente predispuestos, el consumo de alcohol en niveles excesivos persistiría durante el resto de la vida adulta.21

En la bibliografía que ha evaluado el consumo de alcohol en los estudiantes universitarios de ambos sexos, consistentemente se ha descrito que, en comparación con las mujeres, los hombres beben con mayor frecuencia e intensidad, experimentando más frecuentemente sus consecuencias negativas y sus complicaciones.12 En la mayoría de estos estudios no se ha considerado que en las mujeres un menor consumo de alcohol no necesariamente se traduzca en menores niveles de intoxicación y de complicaciones. Debido a que las mujeres tienen una menor masa y volumen de distribución corporal y una menor capacidad para metabolizar el alcohol, éstas, bebiendo menos, alcanzan niveles sanguíneos de alcohol y de intoxicación similares a los de los hombres.22 Los y las estudiantes de la Universidad también difieren en el tipo de consecuencias derivadas del consumo problemático de alcohol. En general los hombres tienden a experimentar con más frecuencia consecuencias relacionadas con conductas antisociales (discusiones y violencias, accidentes, daño a propiedad ajena y vandalismo, problemas legales, etc.), que afectarían al individuo e importantemente a las personas en su entorno.23 En las mujeres es más común observar consecuencias en el ámbito privado y personal (desempeño académico deficiente, actividad sexual no consentida, lagunas mentales, pérdida de la memoria, lesiones auto inflingidas, etc.).23 Cuando estas diferencias de género se han tomado en cuenta en la definición del consumo considerado excesivo y de sus consecuencias, la brecha entre la prevalencia y severidad del consumo problemático de alcohol tienden a reducirse o a desaparecer.23 En este sentido, una limitación en nuestro estudio sería que el AUDIT como instrumento de tamizaje del CRDA, no considera las diferencias de género antes descritas y muy probablemente subestima la prevalencia de este problema en las estudiantes universitarias y en las mujeres en general.

En concordancia con estudios que describieron un menor riesgo de abuso y de dependencia al alcohol en estudiantes universitarios casados24,25 nuestros hallazgos también mostraron una menor frecuencia del CRDA en este grupo. Poco se ha investigado acerca de los efectos de esta variable en el consumo de alcohol de los estudiantes. El efecto protector de esta variable probablemente se deba a que los estudiantes casados se exponen con menos frecuencia a actividades de alto riesgo para beber en exceso. Además, es posible que estos estudiantes se involucren en actividades religiosas con más frecuencia. En varios estudios esta variable ha mostrado estar asociada con una menor probabilidad para el uso de sustancias psicoactivas.26

Aunque en la población joven trabajar confiere efectos benéficos, pues incrementa la autoestima, la autonomía y la responsabilidad personal, se ha documentado un incremento en la prevalencia del abuso de alcohol y drogas en diferentes grupos de jóvenes que trabajan.27 Nuestros hallazgos concuerdan con dichos reportes. Una explicación de este fenómeno podría ser que los estudiantes que trabajan tienen una mayor exposición a compañeros de trabajo de mayor edad quienes consumirían niveles elevados de alcohol. También el tener que trabajar podría ser el síntoma de una variedad de problemas psicosociales que incrementarían el riesgo de consumir alcohol problemáticamente.27

En la bibliografía nacional e internacional se ha descrito un incremento en el consumo de alcohol y otras substancias en estudiantes de estratos socioeconómicos elevados o que reciben cantidades elevadas de dinero por parte de sus padres.4, 28 En concordancia con lo anterior, en nuestra muestra también observamos que el CRDA se incrementó con el ingreso mensual familiar. Una explicación podría ser que, al igual que en los estudiantes que trabajan, éstos tendrían una mayor disponibilidad monetaria destinada a la compra de bebidas alcohólicas y un mayor involucramiento en actividades de alto riesgo para el consumo.

Nuestros hallazgos también concuerdan con un estudio reciente que describió que entre adolescentes de la Ciudad de México, una educación universitaria en ambos padres se relacionó con un mayor uso de drogas durante el último año.26 Sin embargo, nosotros encontramos que este efecto sólo se observó en el riesgo para el CRDA de las mujeres y que éste fue independiente del ingreso familiar. Lo anterior podría deberse a que en las familias con mayores niveles educativos las normas que regulan el consumo de alcohol serían menos tradicionales y más tolerantes del consumo de alcohol entre las mujeres jóvenes.

Por último, a diferencia de estudios realizados en otros países, donde se ha reportado una asociación entre los problemas por consumo de alcohol y el residir solo, con compañeros en dormitorios o residencias estudiantiles,29 no encontramos en nuestra muestra influencias de esta variable en el riesgo del CRDA. Lo anterior se pudo deber al número reducido de estudiantes en nuestra muestra que reportaron vivir solos o con compañeros.

El reporte que se presenta aquí, hasta lo que sabemos, es el primer estudio en la bibliografía nacional e iberoamericana que examina la prevalencia y los factores predictivos del CRDA en una población estudiantil de educación superior.

Aunque no está claro si nuestros hallazgos pueden generalizarse a las poblaciones estudiantiles de otras universidades del país o de Ibero América, nuestro estudio abarcó a la mayoría de los estudiantes de primer ingreso de la mayor universidad de habla hispana. En este sentido son necesarios más estudios para determinar la extensión de los problemas por consumo de alcohol en otros campus universitarios del país e Ibero América.

También sería importante que estudios futuros intentaran examinar la prevalencia del CRDA en estudiantes de niveles académicos más avanzados para determinar si una exposición más prolongada al medio universitario se traduce en cambios en la frecuencia del CRDA, así como elucidar con mayor claridad el papel de los diferentes factores de riesgo y protección. Nuestros hallazgos tienen implicaciones para la prevención y tratamiento del CRDA en la población estudiantil, pues un mejor conocimiento de los grupos y factores de riesgo permitiría el diseño de políticas de prevención e intervenciones potencialmente más efectivas en esta población.

 

AGRADECIMIENTOS

Agradecemos al Grupo Modelo SAB de CV, empresa preocupada en promover un consumo responsable de alcohol, por su apoyo a la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, que por medio de los asesores de la Secretaría General de la UNAM, hizo posible este proyecto.

Al Sistema Nacional de Investigadores por el apoyo a la doctora Leonila Rosa Díaz Martínez.

A la maestra Yolanda Lazo y al psicólogo Carlos Luna por el apoyo logístico para la coordinación general del proyecto, así como al personal de sus áreas clínicas y administrativas.

 

REFERENCIAS

1. Medina–Mora M, Villatoro J, Cravioto P, Fleiz C, Galván F et al. Uso y abuso de alcohol en México: Resultados de la Encuesta Nacional Contra las Adicciones. En: Consejo Nacional Contra las Adicciones (eds). Observatorio mexicano en tabaco, alcohol y otras drogas. México: Consejo Nacional Contra las Adicciones; 2003; 49–61.        [ Links ]

2. Medina–Mora ME, Villatoro J, Caraveo J, Colmenares. Patterns of alcohol consumption and related problems in Mexico: results of two general population surveys. En: Demers A, Room R, Bourgault C (eds). Surveys of drinking patterns and problems in seven developing countries. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2001; 13–31.        [ Links ]

3. Medina–Mora ME. Mexicans and alcohol: patterns, problems and policies. Addiction 2007; 102:1041–1045.        [ Links ]

4. Karam E, Kypri K, Salamoun M. Alcohol use among college students: an international perspective. Curr Opin Psychiatry 2007; 20:213–221.        [ Links ]

5. US Department of Health and Human Services. Healthy People 2010. Washington 2000; 26–29.        [ Links ]

6. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Task force on college drinking: High–risk drinking in college: What we know and what we need to learn. Bethesda: 2002.        [ Links ]

7. Hingson RW, Heeren T, Zakocs RC, Kopstein A, Wechsler H. Magnitude of alcohol–related mortality and morbidity among US college students ages 18–24. J Stud Alcohol 2002; 63:136–144.        [ Links ]

8. Johnston LD, O'Malley PM, Bachman JG. Monitoring the future national survey results on drug use, 1975–2002, volume II: College students and adults ages 19–40. Bethesda: National Institute on Drug Abuse; 2003.        [ Links ]

9. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Alcohol use and risks among young adults by college enrollment status. Rockville: Office of Applied Studies; 2003.        [ Links ]

10. Slutske WS, Hunt–Carter EE, Nabors–Oberg RE. Do college students drink more than their non–college–attending peers? evidence from a population–based longitudinal female twin study. J Abnorm Psycho 2004; 113:530–540.        [ Links ]

11. Brower AM. Are college students alcoholics? J Am Coll Health 2002; 50:253–255.        [ Links ]

12. Ham LS, Hope DA. College students and problematic drinking: a review of the literature. Clin Psychol Rev 2003; 23:719–759.        [ Links ]

13. Quiroga Anaya H, Mata Mendoza A, Zepeda Villegas H, Cabrera Arteaga T, Herrera Reynoso G et al. Consumo de alcohol, tabaco y otras drogas en estudiantes universitarios. En: Consejo Nacional Contra las Adicciones (eds). Observatorio mexicano en tabaco, alcohol y otras drogas. México: Consejo Nacional Contra las Adicciones; 2003; p.85–89.        [ Links ]

14. Mora Rios J, Natera G, Juarez F. Expectativas relacionadas con el alcohol en la predicción del abuso en el consumo en jóvenes. Salud Mental 2005; 28:82–90.        [ Links ]

15. Saunders JB, Aasland OG, Babor TF, De la Fuente JR, Grant M. Development of the alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT): WHO collaborative project on early detection of persons with harmful alcohol consumption II. Addiction 1993; 88:791–804.        [ Links ]

16. Morales–García JIC, Fernández–Gárate IH, Tudón–Garcés H, Escobedo–De la Peña J, Zárate–Aguilar A et al. Prevalencia de consumo riesgoso y dañino de alcohol en derechohabientes del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. Salud Pública México 1992; 44:113–121.        [ Links ]

17. FLEMING MF, BARRY KL, MACDONALD R: The alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) in a college sample. Int J Addict, 26: 1173–1185, 1991.        [ Links ]

18. Aertgeerts B, Buntinx F, Bande–Knops J, Vandermeulen C, Roelants M et al. The value of CAGE, CUGE, and AUDIT in screening for alcohol abuse and dependence among college freshmen. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2000; 24:53–57.        [ Links ]

19. Kokotailo PK, Egan J, Gangnon R, Brown D, Mundt M et al. Validity of the alcohol use disorders identification test in college students. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2004; 28:914–920.        [ Links ]

20. Adewuya AO. Validation of the alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) as a screening tool for alcohol–related problems among Nigerian university students. Alcohol Alcohol 2005; 40:575–577.        [ Links ]

21. Zucker RA. The four alcoholisms: A developmental account of the etiologic process. En: Rivers PC (ed). Alcohol and addictive behavior. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press; 1987; 27–83.        [ Links ]

22. Frezza M, Dipavoda C, Pozzato G, Terpin M, Baraona E et al. High blood alcohol levels in women: the role of decreased gastric alcohol dehydrogenase activity and first–pass metabolism. N Engl J Med 1990; 322:95–99.        [ Links ]

23. Perkins HW. Surveying the damage: A review of research on consequences of alcohol misuse in college populations. J Studies Alcohol 2002; 2002; S14:91–100.        [ Links ]

24. Jennison KM. The short–term effects and unintended long–term consequences of binge drinking in college: a 10–year follow–up study. Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse 2004; 30:659–684.        [ Links ]

25. Kandakai TL. Behavioral outcomes of urban college students' alcohol use. American J Health Studies 2006; 1:1–15.        [ Links ]

26. Benjet C, Borges G, Medina–Mora ME, Fleiz C, Blanco J et al. Prevalence and socio–demographic correlates of drug use among adolescents: results from the Mexican Adolescent Mental Health Survey. Addiction 2007; 102:1261–268.        [ Links ]

27.Wu LT, Schlenger WE, Galvin DM. The relationship between employment and substance use among students aged 12 to 17. J Adolesc Health 2003; 32:5–15.        [ Links ]

28. Zhang B, Cartmill C, Ferrence R. The role of spending money and drinking alcohol in adolescent smoking. Addiction 2008; 103: 310–309.        [ Links ]

29.Wechsler H, Lee JE, Nelson FN, Kuo M. Underage college students' drinking behavior, access to alcohol, and the influence of deterrence policies. J American College Health 2002; 505:223–236.        [ Links ]