SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.76 issue301European households’ incomes since the crisis author indexsubject indexsearch form
Home Pagealphabetic serial listing  

Services on Demand

Journal

Article

Indicators

Related links

  • Have no similar articlesSimilars in SciELO

Share


Investigación económica

Print version ISSN 0185-1667

Inv. Econ vol.76 n.301 México Jul./Sep. 2017

 

Artículos para el debate científico

Optimal transmission tariff regulation for the Southern Baja-Californian electricity network system*

Rubí Espinosaa 

Juan Rosellónb  c 

a Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (CIDE), Department of Economics (Mexico).

b CIDE, Department of Economics (Mexico); German Institute for Economic Research (DIW Berlin), Department of Energy, Transportation, Environment (Berlin), and Universidad Panamericana, Campus México, School of Economic and Administrative Sciences (Mexico).


Abstract:

The tariff imposed over the use of electricity transmission networks is one critical factor to achieve efficiency in electricity markets. In Mexico, the current transmission network tariffs are based on long run marginal costs. We propose an incentive price-cap mechanism and apply it to the meshed network system in the isolated electricity system of Southern Baja California, Mexico. We further compare the current transmission tariffs set by the Mexican regulator (CRE) with the tariffs resulting from our regulatory scheme. We show that our mechanism prices the network at tariffs rendering superior welfare compared to the tariffs determined by Mexican authorities.

Key words: Financial transmission rights; nodal prices; congestion management; electricity; Mexico

Resumen:

La tarifa impuesta sobre el uso de la red de transmisión eléctrica es un factor crítico para lograr la eficiencia en los mercados de electricidad. En México, las tarifas vigentes se basan en costos marginales de largo plazo. Proponemos un mecanismo de precios máximos que generen incentivos a la inversión y lo aplicamos al sistema eléctrico aislado de Baja California Sur. Además, comparamos las tarifas actuales de transmisión establecidas por el regulador mexicano (CRE) con las tarifas resultantes de nuestro esquema regulatorio. Demostramos que nuestro mecanismo de precios proporciona un bienestar superior en comparación con las tarifas determinadas por la autoridad mexicana en la red de transmisión eléctrica.

Palabras claves: derechos financieros de transmisión; precios nodales; electricidad; gestión de la congestión; inversión

JEL Classification: L50, L94, Q40.

Clasificación JEL: L50, L94, Q40.

Introduction

One key objective in an electricity market is to achieve economic efficiency in the provision of its various services and products1. However, factors hindering this goal include incomplete markets, increasing trade of electricity among control areas, construction of new generating capacity that exceeds network capacity of the network, scarce operation and maintenance, poorly defined property rights, as well as lack of investment for expanding transmission networks. In last years, different authors have deepened into the study of electricity transmission expansion. The aim has been to find the optimal determination of network pricing and corresponding adequate regulation. This approach has gained importance, both in theory and practice, due to the liberalization processes in several electricity systems that prioritize vertical separation and unbundling of electricity generation and transmission, together with independent system operators (ISOS). The aim has been to create highly competitive electricity markets that facilitate timely infrastructure investment. Electricity transmission-network pricing is further especially important for generation supply companies to reach optimal efficient supply.

Mexico is currently opening its electricity industry to private investment in new generation and transmission projects so as to provide cheaper and more reliable electricity services to consumers2. This is being carried out through vertically disintegrating generation from transmission networks, and through granting an independent role to the system operator, CENACE. After the approval of the electricity reform in 2014, transmission tariffs are now based on long-run marginal costs through a methodology designed by the Mexican energy regulator (Comisión Reguladora de Energía, CRE). Such a tariff regulatory approach, however, might not generate sufficient efficiency incentives for the transmission network owner (Comisión Federal de Energía, CFE) to expand networks.

The issue of optimal transmission expansion has been analyzed in the economics literature through a range of different regulatory schemes and mechanisms, e.g., Léautier (2000), Vogelsang (2001), Rosellón (2003), Kristiansen and Rosellón (2006), Rosellón (2007), Tanaka (2007), Léautier and Thelen (2009), Rosellón, Myslíková and Zenóny (2011), and Hogan, Rosellón and Vogelsang (2010). Designing optimal regulatory mechanisms is difficult given the specific physical characteristics of electricity networks like negative local externalities due to loop flows, i.e. electricity flows obeying Kirchhoff’s laws3. One approach to transmission expansion has been traditional central planning, either carried within a vertically integrated utility or by a regulatory authority. A usual alternative has been cost-of-service regulation. In contrast, transmission decisions could also be determined in a decentralized non-regulated way.

The Hogan-Rosellón-Vogelsang (HRV) pricecap mechanism (Hogan, Rosellón and Vogelsang, 2010) is an example of a decentralized regulatory regime which combines merchant and regulatory structures to promote the expansion of electricity networks. The HRV incentive mechanism has been shown to promote network expansion in a welfare superior way to cost-plus regulation or no-regulation in a number of analytical studies, even under realistic demand patterns and large-scale renewable integration (e.g., Rosellón and Weigt, 2011; Rosellón, Vogelsang and Weigt, 2012; Ruíz and Rosellón, 2012; Zenón and Rosellón, 2012; Schill, Egerer and Rosellón, 2015; Egerer, Rosellón and Schill, 2015; Neumann, Rosellón and Weigt, 2015).

In this paper, we propose an incentive price-cap mechanism over the two-part tariffs of the transmission company (Transco), which promotes welfare efficient expansion of the transmission grid. We apply our mechanism to the isolated network system in Southern Baja California, Mexico. We further compare in terms of consumer surplus, by means of simulations, the CRE’S tariffs with the tariffs resulting from our model. Our proposed model relies on HRV, a model that has also been tested in several real electricity networks, and proved to achieve network price convergence to welfare-optimal Ramsey tariffs. Welfare-optimal expansion of the Baja Californian grid is addressed in our paper under the new nodal pricing system implemented in the Mexican system.

This document is organized as follows. In section 2 we present a brief description of the Mexican electricity sector enumerating the activities taking place within the industry, summarizing the characteristics of the current infrastructure in the electricity system, and pointing out the regulatory regime currently in place for electricity networks. In section 3, we present the model for transmission expansion, and we describe the data and sources from the Baja Californian system used, the simulations carried out, as well as our main results. In section 4, we conclude with brief concluding remarks.

The Mexican electricity transmission system and regulated tariffs

The Mexican transmission system and PRODESEN

98.4% of the Mexican population has nowadays access to electricity through a grid of 879,691 km. in length owned by CFE (transmission and distribution lines), and an infrastructure of 190 power plants yielding 41,516 megawatts (MW) in effective capacity. The generation park is comprised of 74.1% in fossil fuels (48,530 MW) and 25.9% in clean technologies (16,921 MW)4. 83%5 corresponds to power stations for public service, while the remaining 17% correspond to power private schemes such as self-supply, cogeneration, small contribution, exports, and continuous-own use.

The national transmission system is composed of 53 regions as shown in Figure 1 6, 49 of which are interconnected and form the Interconnected Electricity System (IES); the remaining 4 regions conform a group in the isolated south region of Southern Baja California. The capacity of the connection between transmission regions remains in the range of 90 MW to 4,000 MW. As of December 2014, the total length of transmission lines with voltage between 230-400 kV was 52,815 km, and 58,660 km for voltages of 69 kV.

Source: SENER (2015).

Figure 1: National transmission system of Mexico 

The modernization and expansion of the national electricity infrastructure is one of the objectives of Mexican authorities to boost economic development. In the context of the electricity reform, the aim is to anticipate the needs of the national electricity demand and supply growth through substantially expanding the national transmission system, including a future interconnection of the IES with the isolated network system in Southern Baja California. According to the national transmission planning system, Programa de Desarrollo del Sistema Eléctrico Nacional (PRODESEN), the IES is expected to develop in such a way during coming years so that marginal prices in most areas of the country will become more uniform (see Figure 2)7.

Note: MP = annual marginal price index; MP65 = annual marginal price index in the 65th percentile; MP35 = annual marginal price index in the 35th percentile. Marginal prices expressed in base 2015.

Source: SENER (2015).

Figure 2: Nodal pricing system’s projection for 2020 

PRODESEN is actually carried out through a complex planning system, including a power-flow model to determine specific transmission-line expansion projects. Line expansion are determined using as input the forecast on future growth of generation plants throughout the country annually made by the energy ministry, SENER, Transmission expansion then follows generation growth in the logic of the PRODESEN’s planning process. For 2015-2029, it is estimated that 24,599 km of new network capacity need to be built (see Appendix 1)8.

Regulated electricity-transmission tariffs

CRE has recently determined a set of regulated transmission tariffs the period January 1st, 2016 through December 31st, 20189. The information submitted to CRE by the CFE was analyzed taking into account information of its audited financial statements, costs reported, the relevance of the cost-allocation model, as well as projections on demand and supply. The determination of regulated transmission tariffs consisted of two sequential steps. In a first step, the required income authorized to CFE for providing the electricity-transmission service is determined (adjusted with an efficiency factor). In a second step, the required income is allocated with tariffs to the different types of consumers. The formulas for each step are as follows:

First step:

where: RI, required income; C, return on capital and depreciation; OMA, operating, maintenance and administration costs10; X, adjustment factor for efficiency improvements in operating OMA costs for 2017 and 201811.

The RI for 2017 and 2018 will also be subject to the X-efficiency factor, as well as to inflation, exchange-rate and PRODESEN-investment factors. Table 1 below shows the RIs for 2016-2018 calculated by the CRE.

Table 1: CFE´S required incomes for 2016-2017 

Source: CRE (2016a).

Second step:

Since users of the national transmission network are generators, suppliers and qualified users, revenue allocation authorized to CFE is set proportionally to these types of consumers: 70% to consumers and 30% to generators. The design of charges is performed through a particular form of “postage stamp” based on injections or withdrawals of energy that each generator, supplier or qualified user make from the network. Weights are also assigned based on tension levels, so as to reflect the capacity long-run marginal costs (see Table 2). There are two voltage ranges: higher or equal to 220 kV, and below 220 kV. Marginal costs to develop these two types of networks are different, and there are consumers that that make use of both tension levels.

Table 2: Weighting factors for different voltage levels 

Source: CRE (2016a).

Based on the above weighting factors and the allocation of CFE’S transmission income, generation and load tariffs are calculated according to:

Where Td i,j , tariff for consumer i connected in tension level j; RI, annual net required income; FPd i.j , weighting factor for voltage level i to which demand d is connected; MWhd i,j , energy extraction of user i; MWHd k,j , energy demand of resting consumers k; Tg i,j , tariff for generator i connected in voltage level j; FPg i,j , weighting factor for voltage level i to which generation g is connected; MWg i,j , energy injection of generator i; MWg k,j , total generation injected into the grid for resting generators k.

In accordance with projected demand, CRE has determined transmission tariffs for 2016 as shown in Table 3.

Table 3: Electricity transmission tariffs in Mexico 

Notes: 1. Tariffs for generators apply to all generators participating in the wholesale electricity market, and to energy injections in the first point of interconnection of the national territory associated with imports.

2. Tariffs for consumers apply to all qualified users who are market participants, retailers, and marketers who purchase energy in the wholesale electricity market, and energy extractions in the last point of connection of the national territory associated with country exports.

At the end of a tariff period, a reconciliation of the required income authorized to CFE will be made. Income in excess or less than the authorized income will be transferred to the next tariff period. In addition, tariffs are updated annually by applying, in the corresponding year, an inflation-production-price adjustment factor and the average daily exchange rates12 observed during the year for which the adjustment is being made. For these adjustments, it is assumed that total CFE’S costs are affected 10% by exchange-rate variation 90% by domestic inflation

Source: CRE (2016a).

The model, data, simulations and results

The model

Our model is based on the two-level programming model in Hogan, Rosellón and Vogelsang (2010). More specifically, we use the “capacity setting” version of this model13 that enables the Transco to choose its network capacity and its fixed fees, while maximizing its flow of profits when expanding the network14. For the reader’s convenience, we make in the Appendix a transcription of this model.

This mechanism is applied to the Baja Californian transmission system assuming linear inter-node transmission cost-functions, expanding cost values, a linear demand with a price-elasticity value of at each reference node, and a depreciation factor. A price cap is then set over the transmission two-part tariff weighted by previous period Laspeyres weights. Hourly results obtain as outcomes.

Data

Data collected and used in this work correspond to the isolated electricity system of Southern Baja California, as shown in Figure 3. All existing lines in this system have levels less than or equal to 230 kV. Figure 3 also depict existing generation plants.

Source: Own elaboration.

Figure 3: Isolated system of Southern Baja California 

Simulations and results15

Two scenario analysis are analyzed:

  • 1. The first one addresses the three nodes appearing in Figure 1 for Southern Baja California.

  • 2. The second scenario case considers a disaggregation of these 3 nodes, taking into account an actual detailed infrastructure of 31 nodes (substations) contained in the isolated system.

Table 4 presents sources for the data required to run the HRV model for the two scenarios.

Table 4: Date and sources 

Note: 1/ As shown in Table 3.

Simulation method

Simulations for the Southern Baja California system were implemented as an MPEC problem in the gams software16. Simulations are performed continuously over 10 periods. A congested network is assumed at the beginning of the simulation. The mechanism starts by solving the lower-level power-flow problem. Once this problem sheds feasible solutions for dispatch, losses, energy flows and nodal prices, the profit maximization upper-level problem of the Transco subject to the incentive regulatory constraint is solved, using as inputs the results of the lower-level problem. A linear demand is assumed at each node17.

Case 1: 3 Nodes

This first case analyzes a network of three nodes, represented in Figure 4. These data are taken from information in aggregated form. Simulations run over 10 periods and results are illustrated in Figure 5.

Source: Own elaboration.

Figure 4: Map transmission regions of Southern Baja California 

Source: Own elaboration.

Figure 5: Comparison of results of the HRV mechanism for periods 1 and 10 

As shown in Figure 5, there is initially a congested transmission line. This line connects the transmission node of Villa Constitución with the node La Paz. Therefore, under this analysis, the Transco invests in such a congested line, increasing in transmission capacity. So as to counterbalance the loss in congestion rents, the Transco raises its fixed tariff relative to the variable part. Figure 6 shows these rebalancing over 10 periods. Capacity investments in the transmission network allow convergence of prices in all nodes to a single variable price.

Source: Own elaboration.

Figure 6: Rebalancing fixed and variable tariffs for 3 nodes 

Case 2: 31 Nodes

This case addresses data in a network with 31 nodes and 39 transmission lines as shown in Figure 7. Here, we count with more detailed information on the net-work; thus can be observed specific areas with congestion and thus make in-vestments in specific lines that require it. Simulations over 10 periods were conducted with the following results:

Source: Own elaboration.

Figure 7: Detailed nodal network system of Southern Baja California 

As shown in Figure 8, there are initially various congested transmission lines. Red highlights the most congested lines, while green the least congested lines. It may also be observed that there exist lines that display no congestion. Figure 8 also shows another map with the realized investments after the various simulation periods18 . This analysis permits to observe capacity increases of congested lines over time. Again, the implied losses in congestion rents are compensated with increases in the Transco’s fixed tariff. Another important result obtained is shown in Figure 9. As expected, there is a convergence in the nodal price to a marginal uniform price at the end of the simulation prices.

Source: Own elaboration.

Figure 8: Congested network of Southern Baja California Sur and line investments over 11 periods 

Source: Own elaboration.

Figure 9: Convergence of nodal prices to a marginal uniform price 

As before, our model allows a convergence to marginal prices based on capacity investments on the network. The investment process is characterized by the rebalancing of the fixed and the variable tariffs, as shown in Figure 10.

Source: Own elaboration

Figure 10: Rebalancing of fixed and variable tariffs for the 31-node case 

Tariff comparisons

In our analysis, price zones are divided into 6 zones. Three of these areas represent the areas mentioned in case 1, and the other three areas represent the interconnections between the zones in Los Cabos, La Paz and Villa Constitución. Results lump together the prices in these 6 zones. We compute a transmission tariff for each of the periods of the simulation which allows the Transco to have the necessary incentives to invest in network expansion. This tariff is calculated by taking into account the fixed tariff resulting from our model as well as congestion rents. Additionally, we apply weights in the same way as the CRE’s mechanism. That is, 70% is considered a charge to consumers, and 30% to generators. Tables 5 and 6 below indicate the results obtained for generators and consumers, respectively, when our calculated tariff (HRV) is compared to the CRE’s one. We take the demand projected by the SENER for the next 10 years. The expected payoff for consumers with both tariffs is calculated. The savings or excess expenditure for consumers under our proposed HRV scheme is also obtained.

Table 5: Comparison of electricity transmission tariffs for generators 

Notes: 1/ The analysis is performed only for lower voltages to 220 kV given the data. As the BCS system 2015 had only 2 lines of 230 kV and the remaining 37 lines with a lower voltage. 2/ Demand forecast for southern Baja California (provided by SENER).

Table 6: Comparison of electricity transmission tariffs for consumers 

Note: 1/ Demand forescat for southern Baja California (provided by SENER).

Results then show that consumers’ spending is less under our model. Figure 11 illustrates this.

Source: Own elaboration.

Figure 11: HRV tariffs versus CRE tariffs for generators and consumers 

Figure 11 shows a lower tariff implied by our incentive model than that calculated by the CRE for both network users. It can also be noted that in the case of generators the tariff difference is not very significant. However, in the case of consumers the difference is quite large over all periods. This could indicate that the tariff being charged to consumers by the CRE is non-optimal.

Conclusions

This paper carried out the application of a hybrid merchant-regulatory mechanism so as to obtain transmission welfare-maximizing tariffs for the Southern Baja Californian electricity system. We further compared our obtained tariffs with the corresponding ones used by the Mexican regulator, CRE, to set the CFE’S transmission prices. The CRE actually obtains these tariffs through a two-stage process. In the first stage, the CFE’S required income is determined based on operation and maintenance costs, adjusted by efficiency and inflation factors. In the second stage, a weight is established depending on the tension level at which a network link is being used. This permits to reflect the long-run marginal costs of developing transmission links. Two types of tariffs are then obtained for each tension level. One for generators and another one for consumers. We showed that this CRE’S mechanism does not result in welfare efficient pricing and, additionally, does not provide invectives to expand the network efficiently.

In contrast, our model proposes an incentive price-cap regulation regime over the CFE’S Transco within a competitive nodal-price electricity market that is operated by an ISO (CENACE). Our price-cap formula really establishes a limit on the Transco’s two-part tariff, relying on Laspeyres weights, and incents the expansion of the transmission grid through the rebalancing of the fixed and variable parts of the tariff. This process gradually diminishes congestion rents but the Transco is able to compensate the loss in such rents by increasing the fixed-part of the tariff, a process that inter-temporally eventually leads to convergence to a welfare optimal steady state. The transition to such state is also carried out in a way that both consumer and producer surpluses increase over time.

The comparison of our tariffs with the CRE’S tariffs for Southern Baja California was done under two cases on nodal structure, using real data from CENACE. In a first aggregated case, we assumed a three-node market. In the second disaggregated case, a more detailed thirty-one node structure was modelled. The second case, of course, allows for more detailed results on planned capacity-increase for each transmission line in the system. In both cases, our regulated tariffs align better than the CRE’S tariffs regarding investment incentives to efficiently expand transmission links as well as on eventually converging to optimal social welfare.

References

CRE (2016a). A/045/2015. Acuerdo por el que la Comisión Reguladora de Energía expide las tarifas que aplicará la Comisión Federal de Electricidad por el servicio público de transmisión de energía eléctrica durante el periodo tarifario inicial que comprende del 1 de enero de 2016 y hasta el 31 de diciembre de 2018. [online] Available at: <Available at: http://www.cre.gob.mx/documento/acuerdos/A-045-2015.pdf > [Accessed 02/02/2016]. [ Links ]

CRE (2016b). Como vamos. [online] Available at: <Available at: http://www.cre.gob.mx/ComoVamos/Index.html > [Accessed 15/01/2016]. [ Links ]

CRE (2016c). Memoria de cálculo usada para determinar la tarifa que aplicará la Comisión Federal de Electricidad. [online] Available at: <Available at: http://www.cre.gob.mx/documento/6103.pdf > [Accessed 02/02/2016]. [ Links ]

Egerer, J., Rosellón J., and Schill, W.-P. (2015). Power system transformation toward renewables: An evaluation of regulatory approaches for network expansion. The Energy Journal, 36(4), pp. 105-128. [ Links ]

Hogan, W. (2002). Financial transmission right formulations. [Rechear Paper] Available through: Harvard Electricity Policy Group, Harvard Kennedy School <https://sites.hks.harvard.edu/hepg/> [ Links ]

Hogan, W., Rosellón, J., and Vogelsang, I. (2010). Toward combined merchant-regulatory mechanism for electricity transmission expansion. Journal of Regulatory Economics, 38(2), pp. 113-143. [ Links ]

Hunt, S. (2002). Making Competition Work in Electricity. New York: John Wiley & Sons Press. [ Links ]

Joskow, P., and Tirole, J. (2000). Transmission Rights and Market Power on Electric Power Networks. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. [ Links ]

Kristiansen, T., and Rosellón, J. (2006). A merchant mechanism for transmission expansion. Journal of Regulatory Economics, 29(2), pp. 167-193. [ Links ]

Kristiansen, T., and Rosellón, J. (2010). Merchant electricity transmission expansion: A European case study. Energy, 35(10), pp. 4107-4115. [ Links ]

Kunz, F., Neuhoff, K., and Rosellón, J. (2016). FTR allocations to ease transition to nodal pricing: An application to German power system. Energy Economics, 60(C), pp. 176-185. [ Links ]

Léautier, T.-O. (2000). Regulation of an electric power transmission company. The Energy Journal, 21(4), pp. 61-92. [ Links ]

Léautier, T.-O., and Thelen, V. (2009). Optimal expansion of the power transmission grid: Why not? Journal of Regulatory Economics, 36(2), pp. 127-153. [ Links ]

Neumann, A., Rosellón, J., and Weigt, H. (2015). Removing cross-border capacity bottlenecks in the European natural gas market: A proposed merchant-regulatory mechanism. Networks and Spatial Economics, 15(1), pp. 149-181. [ Links ]

Rosellón, J. (2003). Different approaches towards electricity transmission expansion. Review of Network Economics. 2(3), pp. 238-269. [ Links ]

Rosellón, J. (2007). An incentive mechanism for electricity transmission expansion in Mexico. Energy Policy, 35(5), pp. 3003-3014. [ Links ]

Rosellón, J., and Weigt, H. (2011). A dynamic incentive mechanism for transmission expansion in electricity networks: Theory, modeling, and application. The Energy Journal, 32(1), pp. 119-148. [ Links ]

Rosellón, J., Myslíková, Z., and Zenón, E. (2011). Incentives for transmission investment in the PJM electricity market: FTRS or regulation (or both?). Utilities Policy, 19(1), pp. 3-13. [ Links ]

Rosellón, J., Vogelsang, I., and Weigt, H. (2012). Long-run cost functions for electricity transmission. The Energy Journal, 33(1), pp. 131-160. [ Links ]

Ruíz, E., and Rosellón, J. (2012). Transmission investment in the Peruvian electricity market: Theory and Applications. Energy Policy, 47(August), pp. 238-245. [ Links ]

Schill, W.-P., Egerer, J., and Rosellón, J. (2015). Testing regulatory regimes for power transmission expansion with fluctuating demand and wind generation. Journal of Regulatory Economics, 47(1), pp 1-28. [ Links ]

Schweppe, F., Caramanis, M., Tabors, R., and Bohn, R. (1988). Spot Pricing of Electricity. Boston/Dordrecht/London: Kluwer Academic Publishers. [ Links ]

Secretaría de Gobernación (2016). Bases del mercado. Diario Oficial de la Federación. [online] Available at: <Available at: http://www.dof.gob.mx/nota_detalle.php?codigo =5407715&fecha=08/09/2015 > [Accesed 02/01/2016]. [ Links ]

SENER (2015). Programa de Desarollo del Sistema Eléctrico Nacional 2015-2029. PRODESEN. [online] Available at: <Available at: http://wwww.gob.mx/sener > o <Available at: http://base.energia.gob.mx/prodesen/PRODESEN2015/PRODESEN_2015-2029.pdf > [Acessed 03/12/2015]. [ Links ]

Tanaka, M. (2007). Extended price cap mechanism for efficient transmission expansion under nodal pricing. Network and Spatial Economics, 7(3), pp. 257-275. [ Links ]

Vogelsang, I. (2001). Price regulation for independent transmission companies. Journal of Regulatory Economics, 20(2), pp 141-165. [ Links ]

Zenón, E., and Rosellón, J. (2012). Optimización de las redes de transmisión eléctrica en Norteamérica. El Trimestre Económico, 79(315), pp. 575-600. [ Links ]

*We are grateful for the much valuable help on data recollection by the Centro Nacional de Control de Energía (CENACE) and the Subsecretaría de Electricidad at the Secretaría de Energía (SENER). We also thank Roberto Carlos Ordóñez for very able research assistantship. Juan Rosellón further acknowledges support from project no. 232743 from the SENER-Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología-Fondo de Sustentabilidad Energética, the Center for Energy Studies at Rice University, and the USC Price School.

4Clean energy technologies in Mexico include hydro and nuclear generation, as well as renewable energy sources (solar, wind, geothermal and biomass).

576% of generation capacity for public service corresponds to plants owned by CFE, and the remaining 24% plants are owned by Independent Power Producers (IPP’S).

6Regions Ixtepec (40), Güémez (21) and Loreto (53) were incorporated into the national electricity system in 2015.

7The IES has been meshed in the voltage level of 400 kV in the center, east, northeast and west of the country. In the north, northwest and peninsular areas, the IES is in stage of strengthening, with transmission networks in some isolated links evolving from 230 kV to 400 kV (see SENER, 2015).

8 Appendix 2 presents the corresponding transmission expansion data for Southern Baja California.

10OMA considers both historical and projected operating costs reported by CFE.

11An annal 1% X-efficiency factor was determined for 2017 and 2018.

12Based on the exchange rate to settle liabilities denominated in dollars USA, payable in Mexico published in the Official Gazette, by Banco de México.

14The original choice variables in the HRV model are incremental financial transmission rights, FTRS, (variable part) and the fixed part of the transmission two-part tariff (Hogan, Rosellón and Vogelsang, 2010, Section 6.2.1). For implementation purposes, this original reformulation can be reduced in terms of the congestion rent collected by the ISO, given market clearing prices (FTRS stand for financial transmission rights, a financial instrument used in electricity markets to hedge consumers from nodal-price instruments. FTRS are also important to grant property rights in the expansion of transmission networks (see Joskow and Tirole, 2000; Kristiansen and Rosellón, 2006, 2010). FTRS can also have important redistributive effects in recently created markets (see Kunz, Neuhoff and Rosellón, 2016).

15The following simulations assume uniform congestion levels across transmission lines.

16Mathematical Programming with Equilibrium Constraints (MPEC) is a mathematical technique related to the Stackelberg games used to study constrained optimization problems subject to various types of constraints (e.g., variational inequalities or complementarities). The General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS) is a modeling system for mathematical optimization that solves linear, nonlinear, and mixed-integer optimization problems.

17The linear demand function is a standard assumption in the applied literature of incentive regulation for electricity transmission. See for instance, Rosellón and Weigt (2011).

18Investment is shown in percentage relative to the initial capacity in the starting lines.

Appendixes

Appendix 1. New network capacity for Southern Baja California, 2015-2029

Source: CENACE.

Investment in transmission for voltage level, 2015-2029 

Source: CENACE.

Investment in transformation by voltage level, 2015-2029 

Source: CENACE.

Investment in compensation for voltage level, 2015-2029 

Appendix 2. Transmission expansion data for Southern Baja California

Source: CENACE.

Construction projects and indicators, 2015-2024 

Note: 1/ Laying of the first circuit.

Source: CENACE.

Major scheduled transmission projects, 2015-2024 

Source: CENACE.

Major scheduled transformation projects, 2015-2024 

Source: CENACE.

Major scheduled transformation projects, 2015-2024 

Appendix 3. The HRV model

The transmission two-part tariff is capped with a price cap (adjusted by RPI-in-flation and X-efficiency factors) defined by the regulator. In general terms, the expansion of the network occurs in a such a way that congestion is reduced. This of course might have an initial effect of reducing the Transco’s profits due to the reduction of congestion revenues. However, the Transco overcomes such a decline in congestion revenues by intertemporally rebalancing the two parts of its tariff, mainly increasing the fixed part. The sequence of actions in our model are described as follows:

  • There is an existing network in an electricity market under a nodal-pricing design, and real power flows.

  • There is a single Transco, which has a natural monopoly in the transmission network, and thus decides on the extension of the network.

  • There is information on historical market prices. This information is used by the regulator to set a price-cap restriction over transmission two-part tariffs.

  • Based on available market information on demand, generation supply, and net-work topology, the Transco identifies which lines should be expanded.

  • The ISO manages generation dispatch maximizing welfare ―collecting bids from generators and loads at each node― and it calculates nodal prices. According to marginal nodal prices, the ISO gathers payments from suppliers and pay generators. The difference between the two values represents the congestion rent of the system.

  • The non-myopic Transco intertemporally maximizes profits according to the price-cap restriction on its two-part tariffs, rebalancing the variable and fixed parts of its tariff, and guided by the evolution in congestion rents.

  • The choice variables are line capacity k, and the fixed tariff f.

Our model then consists of a sequence of two problems: an upper-level problem and a lower-level problem that are solved simultaneously. The upper-level problem consists of the maximization of profits by the Transco, subject to the price-cap regulatory constraint. The lower level problem is the ISO’s power-flow optimal dispatch model in the wholesale market, which maximizes the social welfare.

We next present the upper-level and lower-level components of our model. The definition of variables is as follows:kijt, line capacity between node i and node j at time t; F t , fixed fee at time t; dit, demand at node i at time t; git, generation at node i at time t; gimax, available generation capacity; N t , number of consumers at time t; p(⋅), demand function; c(k), transmission cost function in terms of capacity; RPI, inflation adjustment factor; X, efficiency adjustment factor; w, weight; mc i , marginal generation costs at node i; pf ij , power flow on the line connecting i and j; q i , net injections.

Upper-level problem

The Trnasco’ objetivw is given in terms of congregation rents as:

[1]

Subject to:

[2]

In [1], congestion rent A’ depends on nodal-price differences between loads and generators: p i d i - p i g i . Term B denotes revenues from fixed charges, while term C represents the expanding transmission cost function. [2] represents the RPI-X weighted price-cap constraint (E) over the transmission two-part tariff (D’).

Lower-level problem

An ISO maximizes social welfare w given restrictions on generation capacity, transmission-line capacity, and energy balance. It also makes sure that all electricity-engineering technical restrictions are met in a market with linear demand and constant generation marginal cost at each period t. The welfare maximizing problem for the ISO then looks like:

[3]

Subject to:

[4]

[5]

[6]

Restriction [4] means that generation g at each node i cannot be greater than a predetermined maximum generation capacity g max. Equation [5] shows that energy flow pf ij in a transmission link between nodes i and j may not exceed transmission-line limit k ij . Last restriction [6] indicates that load at each local node is to be satisfied by generation supply at such a node, or from power imports from other nodes.

We follow the approach of an economic dispatch within a meshed dc-net-work topology. The transco maximizes profits at each time t relying on the welfare-optimal solution derived from the ISO’s economic dispatch program. Numerical iterations in the lower-level problem provide the optimal values of demand d, generation g and nodal prices p at each node i, which in turn feed up the upper-level program so as to determine the values of capacity k, and the corresponding fixed charge f (see Figure 12).

Source: Own elaboration.

Figure 12: A combined HRV merchant-regulatory mechanism (algorithm) 

Received: January 01, 2017; Accepted: March 23, 2017

c Corresponding author: jrosellon@diw.de and juan.rosellon@cide.edu


Discusión

La nueva organización y regulación del sector eléctrico mexicano. El caso de la transmisión. En torno al artículo “Optimal transmission tariff regulation for the Southern Baja-Californian electricity network system” de L. Rubí Espinosa y Juan Rosellón

Angel de la Vega Navarroa 

Y. Jimena Romero Herrerab 

a Profesor de la Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) en el Posgrado de Economía, de Energía (Facultad de Ingeniería e Instituto de Energías Renovables) y de Ciencias de la Sostenibilidad de la UNAM. México. Correspondencia: adelaveg@unam.mx

b Maestra en Economía y Doctorante en el Posgrado de Economía de la UNAM. México. Correspondencia: rohy17@hotmail.com

Una importante contribución. Comentarios introductorios

Se trata de un excelente artículo, especializado, que requiere ser leído con mucha atención. Necesita, además, un buen conocimiento previo sobre la nueva organización y regulación del sector eléctrico mexicano, en particular de los aspectos que tienen que ver con la transmisión. Es una contribución importante tanto al conocimiento de los cambios en la organización del sector eléctrico que han traído las reformas de 2013-2014 como al debate sobre esas reformas y sus implicaciones.

Es usual oír en foros, a propugnadores de las reformas, sostener que los cambios en curso se están concretando mediante las “mejores prácticas internacionales”. Se olvida que esas prácticas se originan en propuestas que han dado lugar a debates teóricos, a aplicaciones de prueba y error, a resultados exitosos en entornos específicos, pero también a fracasos con fuertes implicaciones en lo económico y en otros ámbitos. La economía, desde determinadas corrientes, ha impulsado, acompañado e incluso justificado esos cambios. Desde otras perspectivas las ha criticado, aún muchas veces desde posiciones ideológicas o políticas, sin analizar realmente su contenido.

Desde que se iniciaron en algunos países cambios en las formas de organización del sector energético (en la segunda mitad de la década de los setenta y sobre todo en los ochenta) ha habido un permanente debate en torno al contenido de propuestas que se concretan en determinadas políticas públicas. Sorprende que en los foros mencionados no se nombre a autores cuyos trabajos han alimentado las reformas, pero que, como es habitual en el ámbito científico, están sujetos a la discusión y a la crítica. En este campo no existen “mejores” prácticas o modelos, sino propuestas cuyo contenido se analiza críticamente.

En esta nota no se pretende hacer una revisión crítica de la literatura, no obstante, y sólo como muestra, es útil citar a un autor que aclara bien la posición que conviene tener desde una posición académica:

Electricity transmission used to be classified as a natural monopoly that needed to be regulated. Merchant transmission challenged this. Throughout its brief but eventful life, merchant transmission has been and continues to be controversial, in both theory and practice. Regulators internationally are now considering what role it should play in the provision of additional transmission, and what modifications to the regulatory framework are thereby indicated (Littlechild, 2012).

Los autores del artículo de referencia, L. Rubí Espinosa y Juan Rosellón, contribuyen precisamente al análisis de un aspecto central de la reforma eléctrica como es la transmisión. Entienden perfectamente el juego de la crítica universitaria y se han prestado a ella, aceptando dialogar con colegas que han aprendido de ellos. Lo primero que podemos decir es que se dirigen a especialistas sofisticados sin esforzarse realmente en que su conocimiento llegue a un público más amplio, incluso en el ámbito académico (al decir esto no pensamos, naturalmente, en un artículo de difusión o divulgación). No nos muestran cuáles son los temas cruciales, sobre todo en países que no tienen un verdadero mercado liberalizado. Utilizan un método muy complejo, pero lo explican poco, incluso en el anexo.

El artículo tiene muchas autorreferencias. Esto es importante para conocer la trayectoria y producción de los autores (en particular de Juan Rosellón, un especialista con reconocimiento y prestigio internacional), pero no hay una preocupación real por presentar y discutir los diferentes métodos de financiamiento de las redes a partir de distintos tipos de tarificación en contextos de mercados liberalizados. Entre otras, hacen falta referencias sobre las merchant lines (David Newbery, Stephen Littlechild, etc.).

Un aspecto interesante del artículo es que se apoya en un modelo original de tarificación: el modelo Hogan-Rosellón-Vogelsang, HRV, que toma en cuenta las inversiones en líneas de transporte (lo cual implica, por cierto, que se base en un modelo físico de la red bastante preciso). Su enfoque toma también en cuenta la naturaleza incitativa de la regulación bajo un doble aspecto: por un lado, busca incentivar el desencadenamiento de inversiones como si se tratara de merchant lines (inversionistas privados). Es necesario, entonces, que la renta de congestión, que va a desaparecer si se construye la línea, sea transferida a la parte fija de la remuneración. Por otro lado, busca limitar los gastos unitarios y la inversión óptima (qué línea, en qué fecha, etc.).

El contenido del artículo

La Reforma Energética recientemente aprobada se ubica en un contexto coyuntural que pretende establecer mecanismos que favorezcan el crecimiento económico y garantice el suministro energético. Éste debe cubrir las necesidades de la estructura económica actual, mediante un modelo energético basado en mercados competitivos que coadyuven a la ampliación y modernización del aparato industrial y a una presencia más fuerte de las energías renovables, en correspondencia con los compromisos del país ante el cambio climático.

Para garantizar dicho abasto, es necesaria una infraestructura adecuada que permita el suministro energético, ya que los costos de distribución y la falta de eficiencia en las redes de traslado generan desventajas importantes. Un ejemplo de ello es la necesidad de inversión para ampliar la red de gasoductos que ofrezca la posibilidad de un transporte eficiente de la molécula a los usuarios.

Sin embargo, esta situación no es privativa del gas natural, ya que también puede observarse en la transmisión y distribución de electricidad, cuya infraestructura requiere optimizar su eficiencia para convertirse en un pilar del crecimiento económico del país. Para alcanzar dichas metas es necesario contar con un esquema regulatorio que estimule la competencia y la inversión en el sector.

En ese sentido, es sabido que la regulación en la transmisión debe comprender: 1) una eficiente utilización de la red en el corto plazo; 2) una inversión eficiente en la red a largo plazo; 3) recuperación de costos de los activos de la red, y 4) proveer incentivos que garanticen una inversión eficiente (Leautier, 2000). Por ello, el artículo resulta relevante dentro del contexto actual, ya que formula una propuesta para el establecimiento de bases económicas regulatorias que incentiven la inversión eficiente del sector. El modelo planteado por los autores estimula la expansión de la red eléctrica, pues cuenta con la particularidad de combinar dos enfoques sobre la inversión en transmisión: estructuras de mercado y regulatorio. Sobre esto Tanaka (2005) señala que el enfoque de regulación por incentivos es un complemento al enfoque de transmisión de mercado, lo cual precisamente corresponde al modelo Hogan-Rosellón-Vogelsang. Adicionalmente, la expansión que propicia el modelo se da bajo un mayor nivel de bienestar, dentro de este esquema de tarifas en dos partes para la compañía de transmisión (Transco), ya que confluyen en un óptimo de tarifas Ramsey.

El modelo consiste en dos problemas que se resuelven simultáneamente; el primero corresponde a la maximización de beneficios de la Transco, sujeto a una restricción regulatoria price-cap; el segundo maximiza el bienestar social mediante un modelo de distribución óptima de los flujos de energía de los Independent System Operators (ISO) en un mercado mayorista. Para tal efecto se consideró el sistema de transmisión de Baja California, cuyas líneas presentan niveles menores o iguales a 230 kV, y se asumió una función de costo internodal lineal (expansión de costos), una demanda lineal con un valor de elasticidad precio para cada nodo de referencia, así como un factor de depreciación. Posteriormente se fija el price-cap sobre la tarifa de transmisión en dos partes ponderada por el índice de Lapeyres del periodo previo.

El procedimiento que llevaron a cabo los autores para la implementación del modelo fue resolver, en primera instancia, el problema lower-level del flujo de energía. Una vez que obtienen resultados factibles para el envío de energía, pérdidas, flujos de energía y precios nodales, se resuelve el problema de maximización upper-level de la Transco, sujeto a una restricción regulatoria de incentivos.

Al llevar a cabo la simulación, realizada sobre diez periodos, se puede observar que al considerar un mayor número de nodos (en este caso 31) y 39 líneas de trasmisión se cuenta con información más detallada de la red, lo que permite identificar las áreas que presentan mayor congestión y así tomar decisiones de inversión sobre las líneas que lo requieran. Al finalizar dicha simulación, considerando la inversión realizada después de varios periodos, se puede advertir que la capacidad de las líneas congestionadas se incrementa a lo largo del tiempo. Asimismo, las pérdidas de ingresos por congestión son compensadas con el aumento de la tarifa fija de la Transco y, después de la simulación de precios, el precio nodal tiende a igualarse a un precio marginal uniforme, mismo que representa un parámetro de referencia para medir el bienestar social en términos del excedente del consumidor y del productor, a fin de que éste tienda a incrementarse a lo largo del tiempo.

Los resultados del modelo permiten obtener tarifas óptimas, a diferencia de la metodología propuesta por la CRE. Para el caso de la tarifa asignada a los generadores, ésta no muestra una diferencia sustancial con las estimadas por la CRE. No obstante, para los consumidores la brecha es significativa a lo largo de los periodos y representa una diferencia importante, misma que se traduce en ahorro. Esto último resulta aún más importante si se considera que a los consumidores se les asignó el 70% del ingreso requerido, por lo que la tarifa aplicada por la CRE a los consumidores no es óptima.

Las tarifas obtenidas por el modelo son el resultado de fijar un límite en la tarifa de dos partes de la Transco en función de los ponderados de Laspeyres y, por otro lado, incentivar la expansión de la red eléctrica mediante la compensación entre la tarifa fija y la tarifa variable.

A diferencia de la generación y la comercialización de electricidad, la transmisión y distribución son consideradas monopolio natural debido a sus altos costos fijos o a su infraestructura pesada (Salanié, 2000), por lo que es necesario una regulación de los precios, de tal forma que éstos garanticen el bienestar de los consumidores. Para ello, existen varios métodos de control, no obstante, no todos son óptimos para alcanzar dicho fin. Tal es el caso de la regulación por tasa de rendimiento, que pretende lograr un precio deseable para los consumidores y un rendimiento justo sobre el capital de los inversionistas; sin embargo, tiende a estimular el uso excesivo de capital y desalentar la producción eficiente (Schotter, 1997). El enfoque propuesto por los autores logra superar este problema y ofrece a los inversionistas un incentivo para alcanzar la eficiencia sin mermar el excedente del consumidor.

Con base en lo señalado por la SENER (2016), para lograr una transición energética a un sistema con mayor presencia de energías limpias, eficiente, y que garantice satisfacer las necesidades de la sociedad en materia de electricidad, es necesario una planeación que promueva el uso de energías renovables, siempre y cuando se garantice el suministro eléctrico.1 Y ello requiere ampliar de forma estratégica la infraestructura del sistema eléctrico. Por tal motivo, en el marco de la nueva Ley de la Industria Eléctrica se considera la planeación y el control del Sistema Eléctrico Nacional, así como el Servicio Público de Transmisión y Distribución de Energía Eléctrica, como áreas estratégicas para impulsar el desarrollo económico y social del país. De aquí la importancia de establecer un marco regulatorio óptimo que formule los incentivos adecuados para la expansión de la red y la eliminación de problemas de congestión, con la finalidad de promover un desarrollo real del mercado eléctrico, tal como lo propone la Reforma Energética.

Puntos por esclarecer, discutir o comprender mejor

Uno de los puntos que no parecen claros en el artículo es el referido a las causas de las diferencias de resultados entre los enfoques de la CRE y el del modelo HRV. Los autores no explican realmente cuál es el enfoque de la CRE (planeación, definición de una tarifa con incitaciones en revenue cap, igualdad territorial, etc.). Si la tarifa de la red es la misma en todo México, ello se explica porque detrás se encuentra una preocupación de equidad territorial y de solidaridad entre las regiones. Es por ello, sin duda, que los autores encuentran diferencias de bienestar. Una opción política de solidaridad entre regiones mexicanas justificaría una perecuación. ¿Da el modelo HRV la espalda a ese principio? (el eterno debate entre eficiencia y equidad).

Nos parece necesario que los autores expliquen por qué debería hacerse un nodal pricing en México cuando no se ha instaurado plenamente un mercado eléctrico. Deberían explicar las causas de las diferencias territoriales y reconocer que ponen en tela de juicio el principio de uniformización territorial. La ganancia de eficiencia que obtienen es muy limitada, porque no da ninguna señal-precio eficiente para la localización de los productores (clásicos, solar, eólica, etc.) y de los grandes consumidores.

La fijación de precios para la transmisión es una tarea complicada. Si consideramos que se trata de un bien que no se puede almacenar, aunado a las restricciones en la capacidad de transmisión, se puede intuir que la fijación del precio en el muy corto plazo resulta de gran importancia para evitar problemas de congestión. Asimismo, los precios son la pauta para la toma de decisiones de operación e inversión por parte de las compañías de transmisión, generación y de distribución. De igual manera, la función de costos es un componente importante para la fijación de precios. En el caso de la función de costos de transmisión, ésta es afectada por los flujos circulares de la electricidad, pérdidas de energía y servicios auxiliares (Vogelsang, 2005). A este respecto, en el artículo en comento no se precisan las variables que comprende la función de costos utilizada en el modelo para la maximización de los beneficios en el upper level, únicamente se sabe que los costos están en función de la capacidad.

Algunos puntos por comprender mejor

1. Se tiene ahora una regulación tradicional de cálculo del ingreso medio en el nivel nacional, con una parte fija y una parte variable, la cual refleja las pérdidas de transporte y el costo de re-dispatching, con un revenue cap y una distribución entre lo que inyectan los productores y lo que retira el distribuidor regional. Se entiende que la tarifa es la misma en todos los estados, incluido Baja California.

El sistema se ve acompañado ―o se ha visto acompañado hasta ahora― de una planeación del desarrollo de la red, en el cual se ha intentado absorber las congestiones y anticipar el desarrollo localizado de las necesidades. Las inversiones anticipadas han sido tomadas en cuenta en el cálculo de la tarifa, la cual se alinea más o menos sobre el costo marginal de largo plazo. La CFE no ha tenido necesidad de incitaciones, por medio de tarifas, para implantar líneas debido a que tiene su modelo de optimización de la red, que se supone tiene precios duales que orientan los resultados del programa de optimización.

No se entiende, entonces, cómo los autores manipulan las fórmulas de cálculo del regulador para encontrar tarifas “pago de los productores” y “pago de los consumidores” a lo largo de los 11 periodos que cubren, como si no hubiera precios uniformes.2

2. El nodal pricing sólo tiene sentido si se tiene un mercado liberalizado con un power exchange que proporcione precios hora por hora y cuyos cálculos son complejos al definir un precio en cada nodo, reflejando los precios las pérdidas de transporte y los eventuales redespachos a los puntos de congestión. Este es el caso de México, de acuerdo a información del CENACE: el mercado de corto plazo inició sus operaciones en enero de 2016 para el Sistema Interconectado de Baja California y el Sistema Interconectado Nacional y durante marzo inició para el Sistema Interconectado de Baja California Sur. Sin embargo, los mercados de Tiempo Real y de Hora en Adelanto aún no han iniciado (CENACE, 2017). Ese tipo de tarificación tiene sentido en las redes dispersas y poco malladas como las de Baja California, en donde hay puntos de congestión, líneas por construir y en donde es necesario orientar las opciones de localización de los productores en función de las escaseces en la red. A este respecto, las tarifas obtenidas por los autores no son representativas como para poder ser comparadas con las calculadas por la CRE a nivel nacional, en función de las características del mercado eléctrico de la región de Baja California. Los autores no muestran una evidencia empírica donde expongan que las tarifas variables del resto del país convergen a los mismos valores que las tarifas variables de la región de estudio. Por cierto, los autores trabajan con 31 nodos y toman en cuenta 15 proyectos posibles en Baja California, con extensiones y costos precisos. Hablan enseguida de seis zonas de tarificación, pero no dicen cómo se pasa de 31 precios nodales a esas seis tarifas localizadas.

2.1. Si se admite la lógica de los autores, se debería admitir que el modelo de la red de la CFE no da un buen óptimo de transporte y que ellos identifican otro óptimo de la red en Baja California.

2.2. Para tomar en cuenta los precios de mayoreo, los autores hacen como si hubiera un mercado por hora (simplificando en algunos periodos) y se refieren al costo variable de la central, que sería marginal en Baja California. ¿Son pertinentes esos precios? ¿No deberían integrar el hecho que equipos funcionando con energías renovables son de aportaciones variables, de costo variable nulo, que van a orientar los precios de corto plazo a la baja (haciendo difíciles las inversiones en producción) y a crear problemas de congestión temporal (demasiadas aportaciones respecto a las necesidades horarias del distrito o, inversamente, necesidad de aportaciones de otros distritos en caso de no haber aportaciones de renovables)? Lo que sería indispensable es un modelo de optimización conjunta de las inversiones de producción y de transporte.

Por otra parte, Kunz, Rosellón y Kemfert (2017), mediante un modelo de optimización de la generación de despacho, obtienen los precios nodales de una representación simplificada del sistema de transmisión nacional. Éste comprende 44 nodos y 61 líneas de transmisión dentro del sistema interconectado del país, excluyendo la región aislada de Baja California, dado que no se encuentra conectada a la red nacional. Dichos precios muestran diferencias a nivel regional, en función de la capacidad de transmisión y del factor estacional, es decir, para la región norte los precios nodales son más altos durante el verano debido a la limitada capacidad de transmisión hacia las regiones del sur. De tal forma que no se puede asumir que los precios nodales de la región de Baja California se comportan de la misma manera que los precios del resto del país.3

2.3. La asignación eficiente de recursos en los mercados competitivos parte de la premisa de que los bienes que se intercambian deben reflejar su costo de oportunidad. Por ello, una fijación eficiente del precio debe comprender todos los costos de oportunidad reflejados en el costo marginal (Pindyck y Rubinfeld, 2009, p. 320).

Por tal motivo, en los modelos económicos para la expansión de la red de transmisión deben incluirse tanto los costos por congestión como los costos por pérdidas dentro de los precios locales, así como la planificación de la inversión. Cabe señalar que los precios marginales locales de los mercados mayoristas en Nueva York y Nueva Inglaterra reflejan tanto el costo marginal por pérdidas como el costo marginal por congestión.

En relación con lo anterior, cuando se desestiman los Derechos Financieros de Transmisión de la tarifa calculada, aumenta la posibilidad de manipulación de los precios spot, la volatilidad y los riesgos asociados a dicho mercado spot (Finon, 2006, p. 604). Asimismo, se dificulta alcanzar una expansión óptima de la red, ya que no se contemplan las externalidades técnicas asociadas a los flujos de energía mediante un price cap ampliado que permita internalizar dichas externalidades al agregar restricciones adicionales relacionadas con el flujo de energía. De tal forma que, si no existiesen dichas externalidades, se podría aplicar un price cap tradicional directamente como una restricción en la capacidad de transmisión y la Transco podría elegir los periodos de inversión en capacidad y, por tanto, los precios de congestión. Esto siempre y cuando el índice de precios de Laspeyres de congestión no supere el price cap. Por otra parte, si se considera que los costos de capital para la infraestructura de la transmisión son muy elevados, la tarifa fija, que cubra dichos costos, provocaría que un número considerable de consumidores abandonen el mercado, generando ineficiencia en la asignación (Tanaka, 2005).

2.4. Un último punto: una tarifa en nodal pricing debe enviar a los inversionistas en producción una señal de localización con tarifas de inyección más altas en donde hay congestión, lo cual puede disuadir a un inversionista de ir a una parte del sistema en donde creará una congestión o, de manera inversa, ir a un lugar en el que desbloqueará una restricción de la red mediante una instalación en una región detrás de un punto de congestión. Lo mismo en el caso de un consumidor muy grande. Todo eso se vuelve muy complicado en el caso de las energías renovables intermitentes. En este sentido, una inversión óptima en sentido económico debe considerar un intercambio entre la inversión adicional en transmisión y la reducción asociada en costos de congestión y de pérdidas, es decir, el incremento en costos por la inversión en trasmisión debe igualarse a la reducción de los costos de la red (Joskow, 2006). Esto pone en evidencia la importancia de considerar tanto los costos por congestión como los costos por pérdidas.

A lo anterior debe agregarse que la volatilidad característica de un mercado spot, como el que se analiza, genera dificultades para interpretar la tendencia de los precios y la toma de decisiones para la instalación de nuevas unidades. Para enfrentar estos riesgos se hace uso de técnicas de cobertura financiera que permitan a los inversionistas cubrirse de riesgos a largo plazo (Finon, 2006) y crear así incentivos financieros para invertir en nuevas capacidades. Por lo que los precios son indispensables como señales del mercado que permitan indicar oportunamente las restricciones en el suministro, con la finalidad de proveer señales de localización para los nuevos recursos; de igual forma, se deben contemplar los cambios en la regulación de las tarifas de la red para facilitar su transformación en redes inteligentes (Finon, 2017), mismas que permitirían una óptima utilización del recurso y atender, al mismo tiempo, las necesidades y compromisos frente al cambio climático.

Los autores ponen elasticidades-precio de consumos para que funcione su modelo. Pero, por un lado, los consumidores domésticos o industriales no reaccionan al cambio de precios en el corto plazo. Por el otro, el incentivo de localizarse en otro lado, en una parte congestionada, no es tomada en cuenta de ninguna manera.

Consideraciones finales

La reforma energética en México, de manera particular en su vertiente eléctrica, ha traído cambios radicales en la forma de organización del sector. La introducción del mercado en todas las fases y niveles, al mismo tiempo que se busca instaurar medidas que lo regulen, no ha desembocado aún en México en un modelo claro de organización de la industria. Los autores del artículo objeto de esta nota, L. Rubí Espinosa y Juan Rosellón, no solamente contribuyen, con su análisis y propuestas, a un mejor entendimiento de los cambios que se están llevando a cabo en México en el sector energético, sino que incitan fuertemente a que tanto estudiantes como investigadores asuman el desafío de estudiar seriamente esos cambios.

Por lo anterior, y para no alargar más esta nota, terminamos con el llamado que hacen dos autores claves en los temas que se abordan en el artículo al que nos hemos referido, uno de ellos Premio Nobel de Economía:

The challenge for future research is to develop regulatory mechanisms that facilitate efficient investment and operating decisions by incumbent regulated network transmission owners, stimulate merchant investment when it is more efficient, and convey the net benefits of efficient investment and operating decisions made by both regulated and merchant transmission owners to consumers (Joskow y Tirole, 2003, p. 60).

Referencias

CENACE (2017). Sistema de Información del Mercado. [en línea] Área Pública. Disponible en: <http://www.cenace.gob.mx/MercadoOperacion.aspx> [ Links ]

Finon, D. (2006). Incentives to invest in liberalised electricity industries in the North and South. Differences in the need for suitable institutional arrangements. Energy Policy, 34(5), pp. 601-618. [ Links ]

Finon, D. (2017). Special section: Towards hybrid market regimes in the power sector. Energy Policy, 105(junio), pp. 547-549. [ Links ]

Joskow, P.L. (2006). Patterns of transmission investments. En: F. Lévêque (ed.), Competitive Electricity Markets and Sustainability. Estados Unidos: Edward Elgar. [ Links ]

Joskow, P.L. y Tirole, J. (2003). Merchant transmission investment. [NBER Working Paper Series no. 9534]. Disponible a través de: National Bureau of Economic Research <http://www.nber.org/papers/w9534>. [ Links ]

Kunz, F., Rosellón, J. y Kemfert, C. (2017). Introduction of nodal pricing into the new Mexican electricity market through FTR allocations. The Energy Journal, 38(KAPSARC Special Issue), pp. 157-172. [ Links ]

Léautier, T.-O. (2000). Regulation of an electric power transmission company. The Energy Journal, 21(4), pp. 61-92. [ Links ]

Ley de la Industria Eléctrica. Diario Oficial de la Federación, 8 de noviembre de 2014. [ Links ]

Littlechild, S. (2012). Merchant and regulated transmission: theory, evidence and policy. Journal of Regulatory Economics, 42(3), pp. 308-335. [ Links ]

Pindyck, R.S. y Rubinfeld, D.L. (2009). Microeconomía. Madrid: Pearson. [ Links ]

Schotter, A. (1997). Microeconomics: A Modern Approach. Cambridge, MA: Pearson. [ Links ]

Salanié, B. (2000). Microeconomics of Market Failures. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. [ Links ]

SENER (2016). Prospectiva del Sector Eléctrico 2016-2030. México: Secretaría de Energía. [ Links ]

Tanaka, M. (2005). Optimal transmission capacity under nodal pricing and incentive regulation for Transco [RIETI Discussion Paper Series no. 05-E-021]. Disponible a través de: Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry <http://www.rieti.go.jp/jp/publications/dp/05e021.pdf>. [ Links ]

Vogelsang, I. (2005). Electricity transmission pricing and performance-based regulation [CESifo Working Paper no. 1474]. Disponible a través de: CESifo Group Munich <http://www.cesifo-group.de/ifoHome/publications/working-papers/CESifoWP/CESifoWPdetails?wp_id=14558893>. [ Links ]

1Este es un tema crucial que está dando lugar a resultados sorprendentes, como se informó hace unos días en La Jolla Energy Conference patrocinada por el UC San Diego Institute of the Americas: “there is no technical impediment to California getting all of its energy from renewables ―now. In simple terms, this means all power could come from sources like wind, solar and hydro without reliance on fossil fuels. This has been the position of environmental groups and renewable energy companies. But not utilities, which typically argue that the grid still requires fossil electricity for stability, because renewables come and go”. Véase: “Sempra VP surprises, says 100 percent renewable grid is possible now”, de Ingrid Lobet, inewsource.org, 26 de mayo de 2017 (las cursivas son nuestras).

2De acuerdo a la Memoria de cálculo usada para determinar la tarifa que aplicará la CFE por el servicio público de transmisión de energía eléctrica durante el periodo tarifario inicial, que comprende del 1 de enero de 2016 y hasta el 31 de diciembre de 2018. Fue publicada en noviembre de 2015, y señala que las tarifas de transmisión son las mismas para todo el país: Para los generadores: para una tensión > 220kV es de 0.0499 pesos/kWh y para una tensión 220kV es de 0.0904. Para los consumidores: para una tensión > 220kV es de 0.0625 pesos/kWh y para una tensión <220kV es de 0.1424.

3Cabe hacer notar que el modelo utilizado para la obtención de los precios nodales no es el mismo que se utiliza en el artículo que se comenta. No obstante, no se puede asumir sin argumentación previa que los precios nodales de la región aislada de Baja California, tienen el mismo comportamiento que los del sistema nacional de transmisión. Asimismo, las demandas de energía eléctrica están en función de la actividad económica de sus sectores, misma que tampoco se compara con la actividad económica del resto del país.


Articles

Respuesta a los comentarios a “Optimal transmission tariff regulation for the Southern Baja-Californian Electricity Network System”, por Rubí Espinosa y Juan Rosellón

Quisiéramos agradecer estos valiosos comentarios. En particular, consideramos que en su sección sobre “El contenido del artículo” de la Vega y Romero efectúan una muy razonable síntesis de nuestro estudio, sobre todo al tratarse de dos economistas de muy alto nivel, pero que evidentemente cuentan con un conocimiento ex ante no tan especializado y profundo de los temas de regulación de redes eléctricas. Es por tal razón que les agradecemos aún más su esfuerzo. No obstante, es preciso puntualizar que, naturalmente, sus consideraciones se basan en conocimientos parciales e incompletos del tema, fundamentados en algunos casos en literatura económica descontextualizada o desactualizada. El objetivo de esta respuesta es, por tanto, acotar brevemente sobre la intuición del modelo que se utiliza en nuestro artículo, así como abordar algunos de los comentarios específicos más importantes realizados por de la Vega y Romero. Esperamos que esta respuesta sea, asimismo, de utilidad para los numerosos lectores de Investigación Económica.

Mecanismos de regulación de redes eléctricas1

Una red de transmisión eléctrica es un monopolio natural que requiere ser regulado. Tanto la teoría como la práctica coinciden en esto. La regulación debe, por ende, lograr que la maximización de beneficios privada, por parte de la compañía de transmisión (Transco), coincida con la maximización del excedente social.

Los mecanismos de regulación deseables son, principalmente, aquellos que no requieren que el regulador conozca a detalle la información privada que la Transco posee sobre sus funciones de costo y de demanda, de tal forma que éstos sean autoimplementados por la Transco (por convenirle al maximizar sus preferencias), y que el regulador sólo necesite efectuar un monitoreo limitado. Por otra parte, los mecanismos regulatorios buscan inducir inversiones óptimas en la capacidad de la red desde un punto de vista de maximización del bienestar social.

Mecanismos bayesianos

Existen dos tipos fundamentales de mecanismos regulatorios de redes eléctricas desarrollados en la literatura económica académica (Hesamzadeh et al., 2017). El primero es el enfoque bayesiano, el cual es relativamente sofisticado desde un punto de vista informacional. Este enfoque domina la literatura teórica y está asociado a dos premios Nobel: Roger B. Myerson (2007) y Jean Tirole (2014). Estos mecanismos se basan, en principio, en una distribución subjetiva a-priori del tipo de eficiencia de la empresa regulada (nivel de eficiencia que es desconocido por el regulador). Típicamente, la distribución de estos tipos se actualiza en el tiempo con un criterio bayesiano.

Las críticas a la regulación bayesiana se fundamentan en su relativa inaplicabilidad. Bajo este enfoque, los reguladores no pueden ser monitoreados en sus funciones, ya que el tipo de distribuciones que realizan se basan en un proceso subjetivo. Incluso, el enfoque bayesiano es complicado de ser usado en la práctica, pues difícilmente arroja resultados cuantitativos que pudieran ser empleados en el mundo real. No obstante, este enfoque sofisticado provee conocimientos sólidos muy valiosos respecto a las propiedades de los incentivos de la regulación. Por ejemplo, una empresa regulada requiere siempre recibir una renta informacional para revelar su información privada. Asimismo, es imposible alcanzar un primer mejor óptimo en la praxis de la regulación y, además, el regulador debe comprometerse a una regulación intertemporalmente estable para que los incentivos sean robustos.

Mecanismos simples no-bayesianos

El segundo tipo de mecanismos de regulación de redes es informacionalmente más simple y se apega a un enfoque no-bayesiano, al no basarse en un modelo probabilístico. La idea central es armonizar la función objetivo del regulador con la función objetivo de maximización de beneficios de la empresa. Este tipo de mecanismos son prácticos, fáciles de entender y parcialmente fundamentados en datos observables y verificables. Existen dos mecanismos de regulación simple no-bayesiana de redes: uno basado en subsidios o impuestos, y otro en precios máximos y restricciones regulatorias. El enfoque de subsidios fue originalmente propuesto por Loeb y Magat (1979), mientras que el de precios máximos data de Vogelsang y Finsinger (1979).

El enfoque ISS

La idea en Loeb y Magat (1979) es tan simple como otorgar al monopolio natural regulado un subsidio igual al excedente del consumidor. Se da una solución inicialmente mejor, en tanto que los reguladores y las empresas comparten una misma función objetivo. La empresa se comporta como si fuera competitiva, al minimizar costos y establecer un precio igual al costo marginal. Este modelo asume información completa, mientras que la demanda y los costos que enfrenta la empresa son conocidos por el regulador. Naturalmente, en la práctica la demanda y los costos no son generalmente observables, por lo que el método de Loeb y Magat resultaría en disputas sobre el tamaño del subsidio.

Es por tal motivo que Sappington y Sibley (1988) proponen el método del subsidio del excedente incremental (ISS, por sus siglas en inglés), con el fin de reducir el problema de la medición de la demanda y, por tanto, la determinación del subsidio. Su idea es otorgar un subsidio a la empresa tal que sus beneficios cambien en la medida que los hace el excedente del consumidor. Este método también conlleva a inversión y fijación de precios óptimos de manera inmediata, además de que no genera rentas para la empresa después del primer periodo. Sin embargo, también sufre de incentivos imperfectos para la reducción de costos, depende crucialmente de la medición del cambio del excedente del consumidor y no especifica la forma de financiar los subsidios.

Gans y King (2002) sugieren la forma de aplicar el método ISS para inducir inversión eficiente en la transmisión eléctrica. El ISS otorga a la Transco una recompensa (castigo) igual al incremento (decremento) del excedente social en cada periodo, siendo también capaz de mitigar eficientemente el poder de mercado de los generadores. La información relevante, requerida por el regulador, puede, de hecho, ser inferida por el operador independiente del sistema eléctrico (ISO, por sus siglas en inglés) mediante las subastas de demanda y de generación de corto plazo. Sin embargo, una discusión tanto práctica como analítica es en qué medida el comportamiento de tales subastas de corto plazo pueden ser confiablemente utilizadas para guiar las inversiones en el largo plazo. Otro problema es que el enfoque de Gans y King puede requerir cargos fijos extraordinariamente altos al añadirse nuevos vínculos de transmisión.

El enfoque de regulación por precio máximo

Contrario al enfoque regulatorio con subsidios, Vogelsang y Finsinger (1979) proponen un mecanismo regulatorio basado puramente en un índice de precios. El índice de precios del periodo actual debe ser disminuido a partir del margen de beneficios excedentes del periodo anterior. La idea fundamental de este mecanismo es, por consiguiente, que la empresa regulada disminuya su nivel de precios si logra beneficios excesivos a través del tiempo. Si los precios son ponderados con las cantidades (o volúmenes) del periodo anterior ―ponderadores de Laspeyres― el incremento del bienestar es siempre mayor al del beneficio. Esto es, el bienestar aumenta en tanto la empresa logre un beneficio positivo. El máximo bienestar se alcanza cuando la empresa no logra ya ningún beneficio, y los precios convergen a los precios de Ramsey, los cuales se caracterizan por ser inversamente proporcionales a la elasticidad de la demanda.

El mecanismo de Vogelsang y Finsinger (1979) adolece de proveer incentivos muy débiles a la reducción de los costos de la empresa regulada. Además, está sujeto a un dilema estratégico: si la empresa espera que se aplique este tipo de regulación, puede incrementar sus precios más allá de los precios de monopolio, o aumentar sus costos, previo a la implementación de esta regulación. Por otra parte, este mecanismo sólo se acerca al óptimo de bienestar a través del tiempo. Pero en el transcurso, las condiciones económicas pueden ir cambiando, por lo que el método requiere de actualizarse por factores de inflación, y choques de costos y de demanda.

Vogelsang (2001) estudia específicamente el tema de inversión por parte de una Transco en el sector eléctrico, estableciendo una dualidad entre la inversión de largo plazo y el uso de la red en el corto plazo. Un ISO calcula los precios de congestión y la Transco recibe el excedente (o rentas) de congestión de la red. A través de un máximo sobre tarifas en dos partes -que consta de un cargo variable (o de congestión) y de un cargo fijo- la inversión que hace la Transco para hacer decrecer la congestión es recompensada con un incremento en el cargo fijo. Si los cargos de congestión aumentan (disminuyen), los cargos fijos disminuyen (aumentan), de tal forma que este rebalanceo lleva a converger a los precios de Ramsey bajo el uso de ponderadores de Laspeyres, maximizando el bienestar social intertemporalmente.

Hogan, Rosellón y Vogelsang (2010) refinan el modelo de Vogelsang (2001) y demuestran su aplicabilidad para una red de transmisión eléctrica. Básicamente, bajo el modelo HRV, Vogelsang (2001) es combinado con un modelo de flujo de energía (power flow). El modelo power-flow es, de hecho, ampliamente utilizado en la ingeniería eléctrica para el despacho óptimo de la energía generada bajo restricciones técnicas de flujos (Schweppe et al., 1988). El modelo HRV se ha aplicado en diversos sistemas eléctricos, demostrándose que es superior a otros mecanismos regulatorios, tales como la regulación por costo del servicio (Rosellón y Weigt, 2011; Rosellón Myslíková y Zenón, 2011; Schill, Egerer y Rosellón, 2015, y Neumann, Rosellón y Weigt, 2015). Un papel muy importante para la convergencia del mecanismo HRV al óptimo social de bienestar lo han jugado los ponderadores utilizados en el índice de precios correspondiente. Por ejemplo, los ponderadores combinados de Laspeyres/Paasche han tendido a dominar otros enfoques regulatorios2 (Egerer, Rosellón y Schill, 2015). Dado que estos últimos ponderadores son especialmente plausibles solamente bajo curvas de demanda simples lineales, otros análisis más complejos se han propuesto recientemente. Hesamzadeh et al. (2017) es un ejemplo, quién fusiona la tradición de subsidios y la de regulación de precios máximos con el claro propósito de encontrar soluciones globales más robustas, necesidad que fue previamente apuntada en Rosellón, Vogelsang y Weigt (2012).

Respuestas a comentarios puntuales de de la Vega y Romero

Nuestro artículo en el presente número de Investigación Económica aplica, entonces, el mencionado modelo HRV a la red de transmisión de Baja California Sur, con el fin de hacer una evaluación independiente de su expansión y de su tarificación óptimas. Esto permite una evaluación de las políticas públicas aplicadas en México a partir de la reforma eléctrica. Por supuesto, nuestro estudio hereda, por tanto, las virtudes y falencias del modelo HRV que, como se ha argumentado en la sección anterior, provee un mecanismo en el estado del arte para la regulación de redes eléctricas. De la Vega y Romero hacen valiosas observaciones y preguntas específicas, que con mucho gusto abordamos en los siguientes párrafos. Procedemos a citar algunas de sus principales observaciones (entre comillas), y las contestamos a continuación.

Comentario. Cita de Littlechild (2012) respecto a merchant transmission (p. 33).

Respuesta. El modelo HRV precisamente combina los enfoques de mercado (merchant) y regulatorio en un solo mecanismo. El throughput de la transmisión es redefinido en términos de derechos financieros de transmisión (FTRS, por sus siglas en inglés). Los FTRS caracterizan los mecanismos de la merchant transmission pero ―atendiendo precisamente a la observación de Littlechild― el HRV los combina con el enfoque regulatorio de Vogelsang (2001). Esto, por supuesto, admite que el enfoque puro de mercado (basado en FTRs), para la expansión de proyectos de transmisión relativamente grandes y no marginales (lumpy), requiere complementarse con un enfoque mucho más completo (como el HRV).

Comentario. “(…) Utilizan un método muy complejo, pero lo explican poco, incluso en el anexo (…)” (p. 33).

Comentario. “(…) hacen falta referencias sobre las merchant lines (…)” (p. 33).

Respuesta. Al tratarse nuestro texto de un artículo científico, citamos las referencias necesarias. Pero es evidente que debemos respetar ciertas restricciones de espacio. No es posible la presentación detallada de toda la literatura de apoyo en un solo documento. Es cierto que abordamos conceptos tal vez muy especializados para aquellos economistas no familiarizados con los mecanismos de regulación de redes por incentivos, y por tal motivo esperamos que este texto de respuesta permita una mejor comprensión de nuestro modelo (aunado, por supuesto, a la consulta de las referencias de apoyo).

Comentario. “(…) Su enfoque toma también en cuenta la naturaleza incitativa de la regulación bajo un doble aspecto: por un lado, busca incentivar el desencadenamiento de inversiones como si se tratara de merchant lines (inversionistas privados). Es necesario, entonces, que la renta de congestión, que va a desaparecer si se construye la línea, sea transferida a la parte fija de la remuneración. Por otro lado, busca limitar los gastos unitarios y la inversión óptima (qué línea, en qué fecha, etc.) (…)” (p. 34).

Respuesta. En el argot de la regulación de redes, un enfoque merchant se refiere a basar la expansión de un vínculo de transmisión puramente en función de las rentas de congestión (determinadas por los diferenciales de precios nodales). Nuestro modelo, si bien considera este último enfoque, lo complementa con la regulación por incentivos de precios máximos. Más que limitar la inversión, nuestro modelo combina los enfoques de mercado y regulatorios para propiciar una inversión óptima en la red, rebalanceando los cargos fijos y variables de la Transco.

Comentario. “(…) Si la tarifa de la red es la misma en todo México, ello se explica porque detrás se encuentra una preocupación de equidad territorial y de solidaridad entre las regiones. Es por ello, sin duda, que los autores encuentran diferencias de bienestar. Una opción política de solidaridad entre regiones mexicanas justificaría una preocuación. ¿Da el modelo HRV la espalda a ese principio? (el eterno debate entre eficiencia y equidad) (…).

(…) Nos parece necesario que los autores expliquen por qué debería hacerse un nodal pricing en México cuando no se ha instaurado plenamente aún un mercado eléctrico (…)” (p. 37).

Comentario. “(…) Por otra parte, si se considera que los costos de capital para la infraestructura de la transmisión son muy elevados, la tarifa fija, que cubra dichos costos, provocaría que un número considerable de consumidores abandonen el mercado, generando ineficiencia en la asignación (Tanaka, 2005) (…)” (pp. 40-41).

Respuesta. Estos son asuntos muy interesantes. Los tipos de eficiencia económica se caracterizan en tres: eficiencia asignativa, eficiencia productiva y eficiencia distributiva. El modelo HRV es precisamente eficiente en cuanto a los dos primeros criterios. En el sentido distributivo, lo es también dado, previamente, algún criterio de justicia distributiva. Herrera y Rosellón (2014) aportan un análisis de los parámetros y ponderadores que determinan las características distributivas de la regulación óptima por incentivos del HRV. De a acuerdo a este estudio, los ponderadores de Laspeyres e Ideales pueden, en particular, ser utilizados como instrumentos de política pública distributiva entre distintos tipos de consumidores y la Transco. Esto último daría cuenta también de los potencialmente altos costos de la infraestructura de transmisión.

Respecto a los precios uniformes, este es un tema crucial en los mercados eléctricos. La teoría y la práctica han demostrado la optimalidad de los precios nodales diferenciados dentro un sistema de red eléctrica, y que reflejen las condiciones de oferta y demanda en cada nodo, así como el valor sombra de las congestiones de red. Un ejemplo es el caso del sistema eléctrico alemán, en el que una regulación subóptima y precios uniformes han generado distorsiones que no permiten, por ejemplo, que la cuantiosa energía eólica del norte fluya al sur del país para satisfacer la cuantiosa demanda existente (Kunz, Neuhoff y Rosellón, 2016; Kemfert, Kunz y Rosellón, 2016). El punto principal es que los precios uniformes, cuando sólo se utilizan con fines distributivos, afectan las señales de precios del sistema y pueden guiar la inversión ineficiente en todo el mercado eléctrico (en particular, en la transmisión y la generación), afectando los tres tipos de eficiencia arriba mencionados. Una política distributiva más racional consiste en establecer precios nodales en el sistema (como en los mercados del noreste de los Estados Unidos3), seguir después con coberturas financieras (mediante FTRS) y, finalmente, diseñar una política distributiva en función de transferencias (o subsidios) directas de suma fija. Kunz, Rosellón y Kemfert (2017) estudian cómo llevar a cabo tales tareas en el caso del sistema eléctrico mexicano.

Comentario. “(…) De igual manera, la función de costos es un componente importante para la fijación de precios. En el caso de la función de costos de transmisión, ésta es afectada por los flujos circulares de la electricidad, pérdidas de energía y servicios auxiliares (Vogelsang, 2005). A este respecto, en el artículo en comento no se precisan las variables que comprende la función de costos utilizada en el modelo para la maximización de los beneficios en el upper level, únicamente se sabe que los costos están en función de la capacidad (…)” (pp. 37-38).

Respuesta. En el modelo HRV, la función de costos está determinada fundamentalmente por los FTRS o, equivalentemente, por la capacidad de transmisión. Las transacciones punto-a-punto, implicadas por el througput basado en tales coberturas, proveen una función de costos que es generalmente continua, aunque no siempre diferenciable. Sin embargo, como lo demuestran Rosellón, Vogelsang y Weigt (2012), tales características no impiden la aplicación plausible del mecanismo HRV en diversos sistemas eléctricos.

Comentario. Punto 2: “(…) A este respecto, las tarifas obtenidas por los autores no son representativas como para poder ser comparadas con las calculadas por la CRE a nivel nacional, en función de las características del mercado eléctrico de la región de Baja California. Los autores no muestran una evidencia empírica donde expongan que las tarifas variables del resto del país convergen a los mismos valores que las tarifas variables de la región de estudio. Por cierto, los autores trabajan con 31 nodos y toman en cuenta 15 proyectos posibles en Baja California, con extensiones y costos precisos. Hablan enseguida de seis zonas de tarificación, pero no dicen cómo se pasa de 31 precios nodales a esas seis tarifas localizadas (…)” (p. 39).

Comentario. “(…) De tal forma que no se puede asumir que los precios nodales de la región de Baja California se comportan de la misma manera que los precios del resto del país (…)” (p. 40).

Respuesta. El cálculo de tarifas para cada región del sistema eléctrico mexicano está más allá de los alcances del presente artículo. Sin embargo, Kunz, Rosellón y Kemfert (2017) realizan el cálculo de los precios nodales para todo el país, así como de las respectivas coberturas mediante FTRs. El paso siguiente de calcular las tarifas para cada región, y compararlas con las tarifas uniformes, sería el tema de una investigación posterior, pero intuitivamente se podría especular que las tarifas de las otras regiones en México no tendrían por qué necesariamente converger a las tarifas que obtuvimos para Baja California Sur. Esto debido a que éste se trata de un sistema aislado, con características económicas e infraestructurales muy particulares.

Por otra parte, el paso de una topología de tres nodos a una de 31 se realizó para hacer simulaciones más precisas. Adicionalmente, las seis zonas en la sección “Tariff comparisons” se refieren a las tres zonas del caso 1 (sección “Case 3 Nodes”) más interconexiones en Los Cabos, La Paz y Villa Constitución. Los resultados en los cuadros 5-6 y la figura 11 presentan una tarifa de transmisión para cada uno de los periodos que incentive a la Transco a invertir en la expansión de la red entre las zonas mencionadas.

Comentario. Punto 2.1: “(…) Si se admite la lógica de los autores, se debería admitir que el modelo de la red de la CFE no da un buen óptimo de transporte y que ellos identifican otro óptimo de la red en Baja California (…)” (p. 39).

Respuesta. En efecto, en nuestro artículo llevamos a cabo una evaluación independiente de la expansión de la red de Baja California Sur. Asimismo, Zenón y Rosellón (2017) hacen lo propio para el sistema eléctrico integrado nacional de México. Esto no implica, necesariamente, que “el modelo de la red de CFE no da un buen óptimo de transporte.” De hecho, Zenón y Rosellón (2017) muestran que el programa de expansión de la red del sistema eléctrico nacional (PRODESEN) converge a un óptimo social. Esto es comprensible, ya que el iso en México (CENACE) utiliza un modelo de flujo de energía para calcular las expansiones de red, una vez que la SENER efectúa la prospectiva de crecimiento de la generación y demanda eléctricas. Entonces, nuestro artículo provee esta evaluación independiente de expansión de red, lo que nos permite, además, calcular las tarifas asociadas a la expansión óptima de la red de Baja California Sur. Esto último no es a la fecha todavía necesariamente efectuado por la CRE, como lo demuestra nuestra comparación de tarifas.

Comentario. Punto 2.2: “(…) ¿Son pertinentes esos precios? ¿No deberían integrar el hecho que equipos funcionando con energías renovables son de aportaciones variables, de costo variable nulo, que van a orientar los precios de corto plazo a la baja (haciendo difíciles las inversiones en producción) y a crear problemas de congestión temporal (demasiadas aportaciones respecto a las necesidades horarias del distrito o, inversamente, necesidad de aportaciones de otros distritos en caso de no haber aportaciones de renovables)? Lo que sería indispensable es un modelo de optimización conjunta de las inversiones de producción y de transporte (…)” (p. 39).

Respuesta. Como lo demuestran Schill, Egerer y Rosellón (2015), el modelo HRV es robusto a las fluctuaciones propias de la generación de fuentes de energía renovable, así como a las respectivas fluctuaciones en la demanda eléctrica. Lo que, es más, Egerer, Rosellón y Schill (2015) demuestran que, utilizando ponderadores adecuados de precios, el modelo HRV es también robusto a la transformación tecnológica del parque de generación hacia fuentes renovables. Por lo tanto, el modelo que utilizamos en este artículo hereda tales propiedades.

El tema de un modelo que incorpore trade-off entre expansiones de generación y de transmisión es un tema complejo, todavía no resuelto ni en la literatura económica académica ni en la práctica de la operación de sistemas eléctricos. Un paso en tal dirección lo han dado recientemente Hesamzadeh et al. (2017).

Comentario. Punto 2.3: “(…) En relación con lo anterior, cuando se desestiman los Derechos Financieros de Transmisión de la tarifa calculada, aumenta la posibilidad de manipulación de los precios spot, la volatilidad y los riesgos asociados a dicho mercado spot (Finon, 2006, p. 604) (…)” (p. 40).

Respuesta. El modelo HRV se define originalmente con FTRs incrementales como variable de elección. Sin embargo, como se demuestra en Hogan, Rosellón y Vogelsang (2010, sección 6.2.3), este modelo puede ser isomórficamente reformulado en función de la capacidad de transmisión. Ambos modelos son equivalentes, por lo que las tarifas en nuestro artículo heredan dicha propiedad. Por supuesto, un tema de investigación futura tendría que ver con la implementación de FTRs en el sistema eléctrico de México, incluyendo el de Baja California Sur. Un paso en ese sentido es dado por Kunz, Rosellón y Kemfert (2017).

Comentario. Punto 2.4: “(…) Esto pone en evidencia la importancia de considerar tanto los costos por congestión como los costos por pérdidas (…)” (p. 41).

Respuesta. De acuerdo. En nuestro estudio ―al igual que en la mayoría de los trabajos de la literatura especializada― abstraemos de las pérdidas de transmisión por falta de información. Si se obtuviera la información necesaria por parte de las autoridades en México, un futuro estudio contemplaría efectuar un análisis más detallado que las considerara.

Comentario. Punto 2.4: “(…) A lo anterior debe agregarse que la volatilidad característica de un mercado spot, como el que se analiza, genera dificultades para interpretar la tendencia de los precios y la toma de decisiones para la instalación de nuevas unidades. Para enfrentar estos riesgos se hace uso de técnicas de cobertura financiera que permitan a los inversionistas cubrirse de riesgos a largo plazo (Finon, 2006) y crear así incentivos financieros para invertir en nuevas capacidades (…)” (p. 40).

Respuesta: El modelo HRV, por definición, contiene coberturas financieras (FTRs) que protegen a los inversionistas de la volatilidad en el diferencial de precios nodales, además de otorgarles los derechos de propiedad pertinentes. Adicionalmente, el nivel bajo del modelo, con el que el ISO se encarga del despacho eléctrico, se define como un programa con restricciones de seguridad (security constrained program) para proteger a los agentes del mercado de diversas contingencias del mercado (Hogan, 2013).

Comentario. Punto 2.4: “Los autores ponen elasticidades-precio de consumos para que funcione su modelo. Pero, por un lado, los consumidores domésticos o industriales no reaccionan al cambio de precios en el corto plazo. Por el otro, el incentivo de localizarse en otro lado, en una parte congestionada, no es tomada en cuenta de ninguna manera” (p. 41).

Respuesta.Rosellón y Weigt (2011) demuestran que el mecanismo HRV es robusto ante cambios en las elasticidades de la demanda, por lo que el supuesto de elasticidad en nuestro artículo es relativamente no relevante y, por supuesto, no hecho “para que funcione nuestro modelo.”

Respecto a los incentivos de localización por parte de consumidores o generadores vis a vis las decisiones de expansión de red, como se mencionó anteriormente, éste es un asunto todavía no resuelto en la literatura, pero existen modelos recientes abordando este tema (Hesamzadeh et al., 2017).

Comentario. Cita de Joskow y Tirole (2003) (p. 42).

Respuesta. Como se establece en Hogan, Rosellón y Vogelsang (2010), el mecanismo HRV precisamente combina los enfoques regulatorio y merchant para proyectos de inversión en vínculos relativamente grandes y no marginales. Para proyectos más pequeños, puramente merchant, véase Kristiansen y Rosellón (2006). Asimismo, mucho trabajo se ha elaborado para responder a esta cita de Joskow y Tirole, incluyendo Rosellón, Vogelsang y Weigt (2012), que fue discutido personalmente por el profesor Jean Tirole en la Conferencia “The Economics of Energy Markets” en la Universidad de Toulouse, Toulouse, 28-29 de enero de 2010: <http://idei.fr/sites/default/files/medias/doc/conf/eem/program_2010.pdf>.

Comentario final

Agradecemos nuevamente los valiosos comentarios de de la Vega y Romero, así como la oportunidad de este debate. Esperamos que los conceptos vertidos en estas respuestas complementen el artículo y sean de utilidad para los lectores de Investigación Económica.

Referencias

Egerer, J., Rosellón, J. y Schill, W.-P. (2015). Power system transformation towards renewables: An evaluation of regulatory approaches for network expansion. The Energy Journal, 36(4), pp. 105-128. [ Links ]

Finon, D. (2006). Incentives to invest in liberalised electricity industries in the North and South. Differences in the need for suitable institutional arrangements. Energy Policy, 34(5), pp. 601-618. [ Links ]

Gans, J.S. y King, S.P. (2000). Options for electricity transmission regulation in Australia. Australian Economic Review, 33(2), pp. 145-160. [ Links ]

Herrera, L.A. y Rosellón, J. (2014). On distributive effects of optimal regulation for power grid expansion. Energy Policy, 69(C), pp. 189-204. [ Links ]

Hesamzadeh, M.R., Rosellón, J., Gabriel, S. y Vogelsang, I. (2017). A simple regulatory incentive mechanism applied to electricity transmission pricing and investment. [DIW Discussion Paper] German Institute for Economic Research (forthcoming). [ Links ]

Hogan, W. (2013). Financial transmission rights: point to point formulations. En: J. Rosellón y T. Kristiansen (eds.), Financial Transmission Rights: Analysis, Experiences and Prospects, Lecture Notes in Energy 7. Londres: Springer-Verlag. DOI 10.1007/978-1-4471-4787-9_1. [ Links ]

Hogan, W., Rosellón, J. y Vogelsang, I. (2010). Toward a combined merchant-regulatory mechanism for electricity transmission expansion. Journal of Regulatory Economics, 38(2), pp. 113-143. [ Links ]

Kemfert, C., Kunz, F. y Rosellón, J. (2016). A welfare analysis of electricity transmission planning in Germany. Energy Policy, 94(C), pp. 446-452. [ Links ]

Kristiansen, T. y Rosellón, J. (2006). A merchant mechanism for electricity transmission expansion. Journal of Regulatory Economics, 29(2), pp. 167-193. [ Links ]

Kunz, F., Neuhoff, K. y Rosellón, J. (2016). FTR allocations to ease transition to nodal pricing: An application to the German power system. Energy Economics, 60(C), pp. 176-185. [ Links ]

Kunz, F., Rosellón, J. y Kemfert, C. (2017). Introduction of nodal pricing into the new mexican electricity market through ftr allocations. The Energy Journal, 38(Special Issue 1), pp. 157-172. [ Links ]

Littlechild, S. (2012). Merchant and regulated transmission: Theory, evidence and policy. Journal of Regulatory Economics, 42(3), pp. 308-335. [ Links ]

Loeb, M. y Magat, W.A. (1979). A decentralized method for utility regulation. The Journal of Law & Economics, 22(2), pp. 399-404. [ Links ]

Neumann, A., Rosellón, J. y Weigt, H. (2015). Removing cross-border capacity bottlenecks in the European natural gas market: A proposed merchantregulatory mechanism. Networks and Spatial Economics, 15(1), pp. 149-181. [ Links ]

Rosellón, J. y Weigt, H. (2011). A dynamic incentive mechanism for transmission expansion in electricity networks: Theory, modeling, and application. The Energy Journal, 32(1), pp. 119-148. [ Links ]

Rosellón, J., Myslíková, Z. y Zenón, E. (2011). Incentives for transmission investment in the PJM electricity market: FTRS or regulation (or both?). Utilities Policy, 19(1), pp. 3-13. [ Links ]

Rosellón, J., Vogelsang, I. y Weigt, H. (2012). Long-run cost functions for electricity transmission. The Energy Journal, 33(1), pp. 131-160. [ Links ]

Sappington, D. y Sibley, D.S. (1988). Regulating without cost information: The incremental surplus subsidy scheme. International Economic Review, 29(2), pp. 297-306. [ Links ]

Schill, W.-P., Egerer, J. y Rosellón, J. (2015). Testing regulatory regimes for power transmission expansion with fluctuating demand and wind generation. Journal of Regulatory Economics, 47(1), pp. 1-28. [ Links ]

Schweppe, F.C., Caramanis, M.C., Tabors, R.D. y Bohn, R.E. (1988). Spot Pricing of Electricity, Boston, MA: Kluwer Academic Publishers. [ Links ]

Vogelsang, I. y Finsinger, J. (1979). A regulatory adjustment process for optimal pricing by multiproduct monopoly firms. Bell Journal of Economics, 10(1), pp. 157-171. [ Links ]

Zenón, E. y Rosellón, J. (2017). Optimal transmission planning under the Mexican new electricity market. Energy Policy, 104(C), pp. 349-360. [ Links ]

1Esta sección se basa en Hesamzadeh et al. (2017).

2Los ponderadores de Paasche se fundamentan en las cantidades o volúmenes del periodo corriente.

3Véase Rosellón, Myslíková y Zenón (2011).

Creative Commons License This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License