SciELO - Scientific Electronic Library Online

 
vol.32 número2El uso de las terapias alternativas y complementarias en población mexicana con trastornos depresivos y de ansiedad: resultados de una encuesta en la Ciudad de MéxicoEfectos diferenciales sobre las actitudes ante la experimentación con alcohol y la percepción de riesgo en adolescentes españoles consumidores de cannabis y alcohol índice de autoresíndice de materiabúsqueda de artículos
Home Pagelista alfabética de revistas  

Salud mental

versión impresa ISSN 0185-3325

Salud Ment vol.32 no.2 México mar./abr. 2009

 

Artículo original

 

Caída abrupta del tono muscular al entrar a sueño MOR en el ser humano

 

Sudden drop of muscle tone at the onset of REM sleep in humans

 

Alejandra Rosales–Lagarde,1 Irma Yolanda del Río–Portilla,1 Miguel Ángel Guevara,2 María Corsi–Cabrera1*

 

1 Laboratorio de Sueño, Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.

2 Universidad de Guadalajara. Instituto de Neurociencias.

 

*Correspondencia:
María Corsi–Cabrera.
Laboratorio de Sueño,
Facultad de Psicología,
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
Av. Universidad 3004,
Copilco–Universidad,Coyoacán,
04510, México D.F.
E.mail:
corsi@servidor.unam.mx

 

Recibido primera versión: 3 de diciembre de 2007
Segunda versión: 7 de julio de 2008
Aceptado: 18 de septiembre de 2008

 

Abstract

Relatively low tonic electromyographic activity of the mentalis or sub–mentalis muscles constitutes one of the three electrophysiological signs for identifying rapid eye movement sleep (REM), described in the standardized manual for scoring sleep stages in human subjects. The other two signs, low voltage mixed frequency EEG activity and episodic rapid eye movements are inadequate for delimiting the start of REM sleep, because EEG activity resembles that of stage 1 and rapid eye movements are not constantly present. The term <<relatively low>> tonic EMG and not <<low tonic EMG>> is used according to the standardized manual because tonic EMG shows considerable variation from subject to subject and from session to session, and more important because low EMG values may be reached during other sleep stages. Therefore, REM sleep scoring is based on <<relatively low>> tonic EMG.

Despite the relevance of the loss of muscular tone for scoring the start of REM sleep and for sleep disorders —such as narcolepsy and REM sleep behavioral disorder, where loss of muscle tone or the lack of it is implicated—, very few quantitative studies of EMG activity during REM sleep in humans have been performed. Amplitude analysis of mentalis and orbicularis oris muscles and spectral power analysis of suprahyoid, masseter and temporalis muscles have demonstrated that EMG activity is lower during REM than during NREM sleep. The mentalis muscle maintains tonically the lowest values during REM sleep with very low variability during the same REM sleep episode and across REM episodes, except for very brief phasic activations, whereas during NREM sleep muscle tone shows large variations within the same sleep stage and along the night.

Only one study exists which analyzes the time course of the loss of tone during the transition from NREM to REM sleep integrating the EMG amplitude. However, it was done for long time windows of 20 seconds that does not allow identifying the precise moment of EMG activity drop.

Given that the fall in EMG activity is one of the main keys for REM sleep scoring, the objective of the present investigation is to describe the EMG activity of the mentalis muscle during the NREM–REM sleep transition by analyzing short time windows of two seconds.

Ten healthy, young adult, right–handed subjects (5 men and 5 women) participated in the study after giving informed consent. All had regular sleeping habits, were in good health and were free of drugs, medication or caffeine intake as assessed by interviews and questionnaires on sleeping habits and health.

Polysomnography (PSG) was recorded using a Grass model 8–20E polygraph with filters set at .03 and 70 Hz. Additionally to EEG (C3–A2 and C4–A1), electroculogram (EOG) and EMG of the mentalis muscle, nasal–oral air flow and EMG of anterior tibialis muscles were recorded to remove those subjects showing signs of sleep apnea or periodic limb movement disorder.

EEG, EMG and EOG were digitized at 1024 Hz through an analog–to–digital converter of 12 bits resolution using the acquisition program Gamma (version 4.4). The initiation of the first three REM sleep episodes of one night for each subject was indicated in the PSG recordings, following the standardized rules of the manual for scoring sleep stages of human subjects. The fourth REM sleep episode was not considered for analysis because not all subjects had a fourth REM episode.

EMG activity of the mentalis muscle of three 30–second epochs around the start of REM sleep (the previous one, the REM entrance and the posterior one) was analyzed.

EMG activity was submitted to Fast Fourier Transform and absolute power for every 250 msec (256 points) was obtained for two broad bands: one from 24 to 28 Hz and the other from 28 to 32 Hz, as these have demonstrated significant differences between REM and NREM sleep, in previous studies. Absolute power values were log–transformed previous to statistical analysis to approximate them toward normal distribution.

The time course of the drop in muscle tone was established in the case of each individual NREM–REM sleep transition for two second time windows, both visually on the EMG signal and also by statistically comparing consecutive 2–second averages of EMG absolute power (8 means of 250 msec). When there was no clear visual or statistical evidence of decreased EMG activity, the 30–second epoch was divided in half.

Additionally, the first rapid eye movement was visually identified.

EMG signals were visually inspected and absolute power values of two–second epochs containing eye movement or phasic EMG artifacts were substituted by the average of the preceding and following two–second means. This procedure was chosen instead of rejection in order to maintain the time sequence. The average of substituted epochs was lower than 1 for the NREM–REM sleep transitions.

Once the significant differences were established for the individual NREM–REM sleep transitions, the absolute power for the 20 seconds prior and the 20 seconds after the turning point was averaged for the group and compared using the Student t test. A level of p <0.05 was required for significance for both individual and group analyses.

EMG drop was statistically identified in 15 out of the 30 NREM–REM sleep transitions (p < 0.05). In 14 cases more than one significant difference was found due to phasic increases shorter than two seconds. Thus, EMG drop was established where both visual inspection of EMG signal and statistical differences were matched. It was necessary to divide the 30–second epoch in half just in one individual case.

The comparison of EMG power after averaging for the group the 20 seconds before and the twenty seconds after the individual turning point showed that EMG absolute power was significantly different for the two bands (p < 0.0001 for both bands).

The first eye movement occurred after the EMG drop in 28 out of the 30 NREM–REM sleep transitions within a range of 2 and 52 seconds. EMG fall was simultaneous to the first eye movement in one case and eye movement preceded EMG drop in just one NREM–REM sleep transition.

Present results indicate that the loss of muscle tone of the mental is muscle during the transition from NREM to REM sleep occurs suddenly rather than gradually, within a time window lasting no longer than 2 sec. This could be appreciated in individual as well as in group analysis.

It still remains a matter of debate if REM sleep is under the control of a single generator that simultaneously commands the start of all of its physiological changes, or if each of the physiological systems involved in REM sleep is under its own command starting at its own time and are only orchestrated by a common mechanism. The loss of muscle tone occurred before the first rapid eye movement in 29 out of 30 of the REM sleep onset episodes analyzed, upholding the proposition that physiological systems involved in REM sleep follow different time courses in agreement with non–simultaneous onset of the different physiological mechanisms as it happens with ponto–geniculate–occipital waves in cats that begin long before EEG desynchronization and EMG fall and with results observed in two studies in man which report that EMG amplitude decreases before eye movements.

The sudden drop in muscle tone during NREM–REM sleep transition may help to understand the physiological mechanisms involved in sleep disorders where loss of muscle tone or the lack of it is implicated, such as narcolepsy and REM sleep behavioral disorder. It can also be used as an objective sign to establish the onset of REM sleep in research where the precise moment of REM sleep onset is needed. The time relationship among muscle tone fall and other physiological signs of REM sleep remains to be investigated.

Key words: REM sleep onset, atonia, EMG spectral power, NREM–REM sleep transition.

 

Resumen

De acuerdo con el manual estandarizado para la clasificación del sueño en el ser humano, tres variables fisiológicas marcan el inicio del sueño con movimientos oculares rápidos (MOR): la desincronización electroencefalográfica (EEG), los movimientos oculares rápidos y la pérdida de tono muscular. De estos tres indicadores, uno de ellos, los movimientos oculares rápidos, es una manifestación intermitente o fásica que consiste en movimientos que pueden ser aislados o emitirse en salvas de varios movimientos, pero que no está presente de manera continua. Los otros dos, la desincronización EEG y la atonía, aparecen desde el inicio y se mantienen durante todo el episodio de sueño MOR. Sin embargo, la actividad EEG del sueño MOR en el ser humano es muy semejante, bajo inspección visual, al EEG de la etapa 1, por lo que el EEG y los movimientos oculares rápidos no permiten determinar por sí solos el inicio del sueño MOR, por lo que la atonía muscular se hace indispensable para ello.

A pesar de que la caída de tono muscular es uno de los principales indicadores del sueño con movimientos oculares rápidos (MOR) y de la importancia que tiene la actividad muscular durante esta etapa del sueño para comprender mejor los trastornos en que se encuentra alterada la pérdida del tono muscular, como la narcolepsia y el trastorno conductual del sueño MOR, son muy escasas las investigaciones sobre el curso temporal de la caída del tono muscular durante la transición del sueño NMOR al MOR en el ser humano.

Dado que la caída del tono muscular es uno de los principales indicadores del SMOR y que ni la desincronización electroencefalográfica ni los movimientos oculares rápidos permiten señalar con precisión la entrada al sueño MOR, el principal objetivo de esta investigación es caracterizar el curso temporal de la disminución del tono del músculo mentalis por ventanas de dos segundos y describir en detalle su curso temporal durante la transición del sueño NMOR al MOR. El establecimiento del cambio EMG en el tiempo permitirá contar con un signo objetivo de la entrada al SMOR que contribuirá a comprender mejor los trastornos del sueño.

Con este objetivo, se registró el sueño de 10 adultos jóvenes, sanos y diestros (cinco hombres y cinco mujeres). La polisomnografía (PSG) y la clasificación de las etapas del sueño se realizaron de acuerdo con los procedimientos habituales. Se identificaron las tres primeras entradas a sueño MOR de la noche. Se analizó el EMG del mentón de tres épocas de 30 segundos del periodo de inicio del SMOR (IMOR), una antes, una durante y otra después.

Para cada sujeto y episodio de SMOR, se calculó el espectro de potencia absoluta (PA) para dos bandas anchas del EMG para épocas de 250 milisegundos. Se determinó individualmente para cada entrada a sueño MOR la evolución temporal de la caída del tono muscular del IMOR, promediando la PA para cada dos segundos, y se excluyeron los segmentos con artefactos. Se estableció la caída del tono muscular al encontrar diferencias significativas entre dos épocas consecutivas, así como visualmente en el trazo EMG.

Posteriormente, se promedió la PA de 10 segmentos de dos segundos previos y de 10 segmentos posteriores a la caída del EMG para todo el grupo y se compararon por medio de la prueba t de Student para muestras correlacionadas.

La caída del tono muscular en la transición del sueño NMOR al MOR ocurrió de manera abrupta y no paulatina en un intervalo no mayor a dos segundos. Los resultados estadísticos detectaron la caída del tono muscular tanto en los análisis individuales como de grupo. La aparición de la pérdida de tono muscular ocurrió antes del primer movimiento ocular en 29 de las 30 entradas a MOR analizadas. Estos resultados apoyan la observación de que los diversos sistemas fisiológicos involucrados en el sueño MOR entran en acción en diferentes momentos y no simultáneamente.

La caída brusca del tono muscular puede constituir un indicador para determinar objetivamente la entrada al sueño MOR que a su vez se puede emplear para estudiar la pérdida del tono muscular en otras alteraciones, como la narcolepsia y el trastorno conductual del sueño MOR, así como en investigaciones que requieran establecer el momento preciso de la entrada al sueño MOR.

Palabras clave: Entrada a sueño MOR, atonía, EMG, transición del sueño NMOR al MOR, potencia absoluta del músculo.

 

INTRODUCCIÓN

De acuerdo con el manual estandarizado para la clasificación del sueño en el ser humano,1 tres variables fisiológicas marcan el inicio del sueño con movimientos oculares rápidos (SMOR): la desincronización del electroencefalograma (EEG), los movimientos oculares rápidos y la pérdida de tono muscular. De estos tres indicadores, uno de ellos, los movimientos oculares rápidos, es una manifestación intermitente o fásica que consiste en movimientos que pueden ser aislados o emitirse en salvas de varios movimientos, pero que no está presente de manera continua. Los otros dos, la desincronización del EEG y la atonía, aparecen desde el inicio y se mantienen durante todo el episodio de SMOR. Sin embargo, la actividad EEG del SMOR en el ser humano es muy semejante, bajo inspección visual, al EEG de la etapa 1, por lo que el EEG y los movimientos oculares rápidos no permiten determinar por sí solos el inicio del SMOR y la atonía muscular se hace indispensable para ello.

Jacobson et al.2 compararon visualmente en el ser humano la actividad electromiográfica (EMG) de varios músculos del cuerpo y encontraron que el EMG cae en los músculos de la cara y el cuello y no en los del tronco y las extremidades. De entre ellos, los músculos submentalis e hioideos presentaron la caída mayor y más consistente, y más adelante el músculo submentalis y el mentalis se adoptaron para la clasificación estandarizada del SMOR.1

A pesar de que la caída de tono muscular es uno de los principales indicadores del SMOR y de la importancia que tiene la actividad muscular durante esta etapa del sueño para comprender mejor los trastornos en que se encuentra alterada la pérdida del tono muscular, como la narcolepsia y el trastorno conductual del sueño MOR, el curso temporal de la caída del tono muscular durante la transición del sueño NMOR al SMOR en el ser humano ha sido poco estudiado. El único estudio existente utilizó la integración de la amplitud de la señal electromiográfica por intervalos de tiempo muy largos, del orden de los 20 segundos.3

El voltaje del EMG de los músculos mentalis y orbicularis oris,3 así como la potencia absoluta del suprahioideo, el masetero y el temporalis,4 es significativamente menor durante el SMOR que durante el sueño NMOR y la vigilia. El músculo mentalis mantiene tónicamente un nivel mínimo con muy poca variabilidad durante todo el episodio y entre episodios de SMOR, con excepción de activaciones fásicas de muy corta duración.3 En cambio, durante el sueño NMOR, aunque el tono muscular cae en comparación con la vigilia, el EMG es muy variable dentro de un mismo episodio y entre episodios a lo largo de la noche,5 lo que vuelve muy difícil determinar mediante la inspección visual el momento preciso del inicio del SMOR.1

Dada la relevancia del comportamiento del tono muscular en algunos trastornos del sueño, como la narcolepsia y el trastorno conductual del sueño MOR, y el desconocimiento del curso temporal de la caída del tono muscular al inicio del sueño MOR, se emprendió esta investigación con el objetivo de caracterizar el curso temporal de la disminución del tono del músculo mentalis por ventanas de dos segundos y describir en detalle su curso temporal durante la transición del sueño NMOR al SMOR. El conocimiento del cambio EMG en sujetos sanos permitirá contar con un signo objetivo de la entrada al sueño MOR y permitirá el estudio del EMG en trastornos del sueño en los que hay alteración del tono muscular. Lo anterior contribuirá a una mejor comprensión de dichos trastornos.

 

MÉTODO

Participaron 10 adultos jóvenes (cinco hombres y cinco mujeres) de entre 25 y 30 años de edad (media: 25.1 años), sanos y diestros según la prueba de Annet,6 que formaron parte del grupo control de otro estudio. Los participantes se reclutaron en la comunidad universitaria mediante convocatorias realizadas con carteles. Se seleccionaron mediante un examen clínico y una entrevista individual estructurada realizada por un médico especializado en medicina del sueño para descartar aquellos que presentaran alteraciones del sueño, uso de drogas que pudieran afectarlo o al EEG o al EMG, esquemas irregulares de sueño, depresión o ansiedad. Se excluyeron los participantes que presentaron trastornos del sueño en la polisomnografía (PSG), como apnea del sueño, movimiento periódico de los miembros (MPM), o trastorno conductual del sueño MOR, presencia en orina de cocaína, anfetaminas, mariguana, opioides y benzodiazepinas mediante la prueba Multi Drug 6 Panel Urine Test (COC/ AMP/THC/OPI/BZD. MEDIMPEX United Inc. 984 Bristol Pike, Bensalem, PA 19020. USA), realizada la noche previa a la PSG, o puntajes que indicaran niveles clínicos de depresión en las escalas de Hamilton y Beck,7,8 y de ansiedad en las dos escalas de la Escala de Ansiedad (IDARE),9 la de Ansiedad–Rasgo, que se refiere a características relativamente estables en la propensión a la ansiedad y la de Ansiedad–Estado, que evalúa el estado transitorio en el momento de la prueba. Ninguno de los participantes mostró en estas escalas puntajes elevados indicativos de ansiedad o depresión. El promedio en la escala de Beck fue de 3; en la de Hamilton, de 4.5; en la de Ansiedad–Rasgo, de 35.12; y en la Ansiedad–Estado, de 28.50.

A todos los participantes se les instruyó en los objetivos y características generales del estudio con el propósito de obtener por escrito su consentimiento de participación voluntaria.

Polisomnografía y registro electroencefalográfico

Los registros de EEG (C3–A2 y C4–A1), electro–oculo–grama (EOG) y EMG del mentón para la PSG, así como la clasificación de las etapas del sueño, se realizaron de acuerdo con los procedimientos habituales.1 Se registraron además la frecuencia cardiaca en la región precordial (V5), el flujo de aire naso–bucal y el EMG de los músculos tibiales anteriores. Estos últimos se realizaron para detectar la apnea del sueño y el movimiento periódico de los miembros con fines de exclusión para el estudio. En el caso de las mujeres, el registro de sueño se programó entre el 5°–10° día de su ciclo menstrual para evitar los efectos de éste sobre la actividad eléctrica cerebral.10

Las señales de toda la noche se amplificaron en un polígrafo Grass, Modelo 8–20 E, con filtros de corte entre 0.03 y 70 Hz y se digitalizaron con una frecuencia de muestreo de 1024 Hz en una computadora Pentium IV por medio de un convertidor analógico–digital de 12 bits de resolución con el programa de captura Gamma (versión 4.4).

Análisis del EMG del periodo de transición al SMOR

Se identificaron las entradas a SMOR de toda la noche de los 10 sujetos y se seleccionaron para su análisis los tres primeros episodios porque no todos los sujetos tuvieron más de tres episodios de SMOR. El inicio del SMOR se definió siguiendo las recomendaciones del manual estandarizado.1

Se analizó el EMG del mentón de tres épocas de 30 segundos del periodo de inicio del sueño MOR (IMOR): la primera época de 30 segundos que cumpliera con los criterios establecidos en el mencionado manual, la época de 30 segundos de sueño lento (E1, E2, E3 o E4) inmediatamente anterior y la época de 30 segundos de SMOR inmediatamente posterior, o hasta encontrar el primer movimiento ocular.

Análisis individual del EMG

Para cada sujeto y episodio de SMOR, se calculó el espectro de potencia absoluta (PA) de banda estrecha (2 Hz) para épocas de 250 milisegundos (256 puntos) del IMOR con la Transformada Rápida de Fourier por medio del programa POTENCOR.11 Se promediaron los valores para dos bandas anchas, una de 20 a 24 Hz y la otra de 28–32 Hz. Estas bandas se seleccionaron dado que, de acuerdo con los resultados de Okura y et al.,4 estas frecuencias muestran diferencias significativas entre el sueño NMOR y el SMOR y excluyen frecuencias presentes en la actividad electrocardiográfica que pudieran alterar el análisis de la actividad muscular. Los valores de PA se transformaron a logaritmos para aproximarlos a una distribución normal antes del análisis estadístico.12

Para cada entrada a SMOR, se determinó individualmente la evolución temporal de la caída del tono muscular del IMOR por ventanas de dos segundos, para lo cual se obtuvieron el promedio y la desviación estándar de la PA de cada banda ancha del EMG para cada 8 segmentos de 250 milisegundos y se compararon los promedios de cada dos segundos consecutivos mediante pruebas t de Student para muestras correlacionadas. Se estableció un nivel de probabilidad de p<0.05.

Las señales se inspeccionaron fuera de línea y se marcaron aquellos segmentos de dos segundos que mostraron artefactos de movimientos oculares o activaciones fásicas en el trazo EMG. La potencia absoluta de las épocas de dos segundos que mostraron artefactos se substituyó por el promedio de la época inmediatamente anterior y posterior. El promedio de segmentos rechazados fue menor de 1. El rechazo se hizo posterior al análisis espectral para no perder la secuencia temporal.

Análisis de grupo

Para el análisis de grupo, primero se determinaron, de manera individual en cada entrada a SMOR, las dos épocas de dos segundos consecutivas que mostraron diferencias estadísticas en el EMG. Mediante la inspección visual del trazo electromiográfico, se ubicó además la caída del tono muscular. En los casos en que no hubo diferencias estadísticas en el EMG individual ni evidencia visual clara de cambio en el trazo EMG, se dividió a la mitad la época de 30 segundos. Posteriormente, se promedió la PA de los 10 segmentos de dos segundos previos y de los 10 segmentos posteriores a la caída del EMG y se obtuvo un promedio para cada sujeto. Se compararon utilizando la prueba t de Student para muestras correlacionadas. Se estableció un nivel de probabilidad de p< 0.05.

En forma adicional se identificó en el tiempo en forma visual el primer movimiento ocular con respecto a la caída del tono muscular.

 

RESULTADOS

La latencia al primer episodio de sueño MOR fue en promedio 120.05min (DS=76.11) y la media del número de episodios de sueño MOR fue de 4.2; ambos valores se encuentran dentro de los límites normales para la edad de estos sujetos.13

De las 30 entradas a SMOR analizadas, tres por cada sujeto, la estadística detectó claramente la caída del tono muscular en 15 de las entradas. En 14 fue necesario establecer visualmente en el trazo electromiográfico la división para el análisis de grupo debido no a una ausencia de diferencias significativas, sino a más de una diferencia significativa a lo largo del IMOR. La inspección visual de esos casos identificó los segmentos que introdujeron diferencias estadísticas como correspondientes a activaciones fásicas de breve duración, por lo que se descartaron para la división, y se tomó la época en la que coincidió la estadística y la inspección visual. Solamente en un caso fue necesario dividir a la mitad la época de 30 segundos, ya que ni la estadística ni la inspección visual permitieron establecer confiablemente la división.

La figura 1 ilustra el análisis individual de la caída del tono muscular para una entrada a SMOR de un sujeto en la época de 30 segundos donde disminuyó el tono muscular. Como puede verse, la caída del tono muscular es evidente tanto en el trazo EMG en el segundo 16 en la parte superior como en los promedios de PA de cada dos segundos en la parte inferior. La diferencia entre los dos segmentos de dos segundos es evidente. La estadística arrojó un diferencia significativa de p<.002 entre la media 8 y la media 9, coincidente con la caída muscular y no entre las demás medias.

 

En las figuras 2 y 3 se muestra el promedio del grupo para cada dos segundos del IMOR de todas las entradas al SMOR para la banda de 20 a 24Hz y para la banda de 28 a 32Hz respectivamente. La diferencia de PA del promedio de los 20 segundos previos y de los 20 segundos posteriores fue significativa para las dos bandas (p<.0001).

 

 

En 29 de los 30 casos, el primer movimiento ocular rápido apareció simultáneamente o bien después de la caída del EMG. En un caso fue simultáneo y en 28 casos fue posterior, con un rango de entre 2 y 52 segundos. Solamente en un caso se detectó el movimiento ocular antes de la caída del EMG. El rango tan amplio y variable del intervalo de tiempo entre la caída del tono muscular y el primer movimiento ocular no permitió realizar un análisis estadístico confiable.

 

DISCUSIÓN

Como puede apreciarse en el análisis de grupo y en los análisis individuales, la caída del tono muscular en la transición del sueño NMOR al SMOR es una caída abrupta y no paulatina que ocurre en un intervalo no mayor a dos segundos.

El SMOR se acompaña de cambios tónicos y fásicos que involucran al Sistema Nervioso Central, al sistema músculo esquelético y al Sistema Nervioso Autónomo. Algunos son de naturaleza tónica, como la desincronización EEG y la pérdida de tono muscular,14 y otros son de naturaleza fásica como los movimientos oculares rápidos, las activaciones musculares fásicas y los cambios en el tono simpático.15,16 En la actualidad continúa siendo tema de debate si la instalación del SMOR se debe a un solo generador que comanda simultáneamente todas sus manifestaciones fisiológicas o si cada uno de los sistemas fisiológicos involucrados se pone en marcha en diferentes momentos bajo un orquestador común. Por ejemplo, Pompeiano17 demostró que la elevación del umbral de excitabilidad sensorial no ocurre simultáneamente en todos los sistemas sensoriales ni en el sistema motor. La instalación del SMOR en los gatos va precedida por un periodo de varios segundos en el que empiezan a aparecer los potenciales pontogenículo–occipitales antes de que inicien la desincronización y los movimientos oculares.

La atonía muscular durante el SMOR se debe a una desfacilitación e hiperpolarización de las motoneuronas espinales y craneanas, de 2 a 10 milivoltios de magnitud, debida a una influencia inhibitoria postsináptica,18,19 prominente aunque no exclusivamente glicinérgica, que se origina en neuronas localizadas en la región inhibitoria del núcleo magnocelular del bulbo. Aunque se sabe que estas neuronas son colinoceptivas, aún sigue sin precisarse el origen de la influencia excitatoria colinérgica que las excita durante el SMOR. Las evidencias provenientes del registro unitario, de lesiones o estimulación colinérgica con carbacol en el tallo cerebral han identificado varias regiones pontinas, y no una sola, que parecen ejercer una influencia excitatoria sobre el sistema responsable de la atonía, como son el núcleo reticularis pontis oralis20 y el perilocus coeruleus alfa.21

La pérdida de tono muscular antes del primer movimiento ocular, que se observó en 29 de las 30 entradas a SMOR analizadas, es congruente con el inicio no simultáneo de los diversos mecanismos fisiológicos que intervienen en el SMOR, así como con los resultados de Bliwise et al.3 y de Hadjiyannakis et al.,22 quienes han observado que la caída de voltaje en el músculo ocurre en ocasiones mucho antes de que inicien los movimientos oculares rápidos.

El registro electromiográfico con electrodos de superficie no tiene la precisión de los que se obtienen con electrodos de aguja, ya que los electrodos colocados sobre la piel pueden registrar también, por conducción en volumen, la actividad de otros músculos. Tampoco permite establecer valores absolutos de voltaje debido a la influencia de factores que varían de un sujeto a otro, como el grosor y la impedancia de la piel, y que pueden influir además de manera asimétrica en cada uno de los electrodos del registro bipolar. A pesar de estos inconvenientes, los registros polisomnográficos del sueño en el ser humano se realizan con electrodos de superficie, con lo que se prioriza el uso de métodos menos invasivos y con menor probabilidad de afectar la conciliación del sueño, en condiciones ya de por sí incómodas. En el ser humano no se ha detectado una ausencia total de actividad muscular, por ejemplo en el músculo mentalis, aunque mantiene valores muy bajos durante el sueño MOR, pues persiste en él un voltaje de .3 micv en promedio.3 Debido a esto algunos autores4 han propuesto que se debe hablar únicamente de hipotonía y no de atonía muscular durante el SMOR.

A pesar de las limitaciones del registro de superficie, se detectaron cambios altamente significativos y evidentes en la actividad electromiográfica que muestran que la caída de tono muscular es abrupta y no paulatina, y que permiten establecer con precisión la pérdida del tono muscular a la entrada al SMOR en un intervalo no mayor a dos segundos.

La caída brusca del tono muscular puede constituir un indicador para determinar objetivamente la entrada al SMOR que a su vez puede emplearse para estudiar la pérdida del tono muscular en trastornos como la narcolepsia, o alteraciones en la caída del tono muscular como en el trastorno conductual del sueño MOR y enfermedades neurodegenerativas, así como en investigaciones que requieran establecer el momento preciso de la entrada al sueño MOR. Resta por determinar la relación temporal precisa que guarda la caída del tono muscular con otros indicadores, como los cambios en la actividad electroencefalográfica.

 

AGRADECIMIENTOS

Proyecto financiado parcialmente por DGAPA–Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, IN–209406–2 y por el CONACYT 50709. La primera autora recibió una beca del CONACYT. Se agradece al ingeniero Fernando Salinas Iñiguez por la elaboración de un aparato para medir el EMG e igualmente a la bióloga Isabel Pérez Montfort por la corrección del resumen en inglés. A Pedro Figueredo–Rodríguez, Alfonso Pérez–Ortiz y Jorge Iván Sánchez–Romero quienes participaron en los registros polisomnográficos.

 

REFERENCIAS

1. Rechtschaffen A, Kales A (eds). A manual of standarized terminology, techniques and scoring system for sleep stages of human subjects. Los Angeles: Brain Information Service/Brain Research Institute; 1968.        [ Links ]

2. Jacobson A, Kales A, Lehmann D, Hoedemaker S. Muscle tonus in human subjects during sleep and dreaming. Exp Neurol 1964;10:418–424.        [ Links ]

3. Bliwise D, Coleman R, Bergmann B, Wincor MZ, Pivik RT et al. Facial muscle active tonus during REM and NREM sleep. Psychophysiology 1974;11:497–508.        [ Links ]

4. Okura K, Kato T, Montplaisir JY, Sessle BJ, Lavigne GJ. Quantitative analysis of surface EMG activity of cranial and leg muscles across sleep stages in human. Clin Neurophysiol 2006;117:269–278.        [ Links ]

5. Brunner DP, Dijk, DJ, Borbély A. A quantitative analysis of phasic and tonic submental EMG activity in human sleep. Physiol Behav 1990;48:741–748.        [ Links ]

6. Annet M. The binomial distribution of right, mixed and left–handedness. Q J Exp Psychol, 1967;61:303–21.        [ Links ]

7. Díaz A. Guía práctica: manejo del espectro depresión–ansiedad. México; 1998.        [ Links ]

8. Jurado S, Villegas ME, Méndez L, Rodríguez F, Loperena V et al. La estandarización del Inventario de Depresión de Beck para los residentes de la Ciudad de México. Salud Mental 1998; 21:3.        [ Links ]

9. Spielberger CD, Díaz–Guerrero R. IDARE: Inventario de ansiedad, rasgo–estado. México: El Manual Moderno; 1975.        [ Links ]

10. Solís–Ortiz S, Ramos J, Arce C, Guevara MA, Corsi–Cabrera M. EEG oscillations during menstrual cycle. Int J Neurosci 1994;76:279–292.        [ Links ]

11. Guevara MA, Ramos J, Hernández–González M, Zarabozo D, Corsi–Cabrera M. POTENCOR: a program to calculate power and correlation spectra of EEG signals. Comput Methods Programs Biomed 2002;72:241–250.        [ Links ]

12. Möcks J, Gasser T. How to select epochs of the EEG at rest for quantitative analysis. Electroencephalogr Clin Neurophysiol 1984;58:89–92.        [ Links ]

13. Williams RL, Karakan I, Hursch CJ. EEG of human sleep: Clinical applications. New York: Wiley; 1974.        [ Links ]

14. Jouvet M, Michel F. Correlations electromyographiques du sommeil chez le chat decortiqué et mesencephalique chronique. En: Steriade M, Mc–Carley RW (eds.). Brainstem control of wakefulness and sleep. Nueva York: Plenum Press; 1990.        [ Links ]

15. Corsi–Cabrera M: Psicofisiología del sueño. México: Trillas; 1983.        [ Links ]

16. Steriade M, McCarley RW. Brainstem control of wakefulness and sleep. Nueva York: Plenum Press; 1990.        [ Links ]

17. Pompeiano O. The neurophysiological mechanisms of the postural and motor events during desynchronized sleep. Proc Assoc Res Nerv Ment Dis 1967;45:351–423.        [ Links ]

18. Chandler SH, Nakamura Y, Chase MH. Intracellular analysis of synaptic potentials induced in trigeminal jaw–closer motoneurons by pontomesencephalic reticular stimulation during sleep and wakefulness. J Neurophysiol 1980;44:372–82.        [ Links ]

19. Chase MH, Morales FR. Control of motoneurons during sleep. En: Kryger MH, Roth T, Dement WC (eds). Principles and practice of sleep medicine. USA: WB Saunders Company; 2000.        [ Links ]

20. Takakusaki K, Sakamoto T, Mori S. Chemical modulation of medullary output neurons which control excitability of hindlimb alpha–motoneurons in cats. Soc Neurosci Abstr 1988; 14:180.        [ Links ]

21. Sakai K, Sastre JP, Kanamori N, Jouvet M. State specific neurons in the ponto–medullary reticular formation with special reference to the postural atonia during paradoxical sleep in the cat. En: Ajmone–Marsan C, Pompeiano O (eds). Brain Mechanisms of perceptual awareness and purposeful behavior. Nueva York: Raven Press; 1981; p. 405–429.        [ Links ]

22. Hadjiyannakis K, Ogilvie RD, Alloway CED, Shapiro C. FFT analysis of EEG during stage 2–to–REM transitions in narcoleptic patients and normal sleepers. Electroencephalogr Clin Neurophysiol 1997;103:543–553.        [ Links ]